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Article: The impact of immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong

TitleThe impact of immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAcculturation
Breastfeeding
Chinese
Hong Kong
Immigrants
Issue Date2018
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1523-536X
Citation
Birth, 2018, v. 45 n. 1, p. 94-102 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Researchers have found breastfeeding disparities between immigrant and native‐born women in many countries. However, most studies on immigration and breastfeeding practices have been in Western countries. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of length of time since immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants living in Hong Kong. Methods We recruited 2704 mother‐infant pairs from the postnatal wards of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. We examined the effect of migration status on the duration of any and exclusive breastfeeding. Results Breastfeeding duration was progressively shorter as the time since immigration increased. When compared with mothers who had lived in Hong Kong for <5 years, Hong Kong‐born participants had a 30% higher risk of stopping any breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] 1.34 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.10‐1.63]) and exclusive breastfeeding (HR 1.33 [95% CI 1.11‐1.58]). In both Hong Kong‐born and immigrant participants, breastfeeding cessation was associated with return to work postpartum and the husband's preference for infant formula or mixed feeding. Intention to exclusively breastfeed and to breastfeed for >6 months, and previous breastfeeding experience substantially reduced the risk of breastfeeding cessation for both Hong Kong‐born and immigrant participants. Conclusions Health care professionals should consider immigration history in their assessment of pregnant women and provide culturally adapted breastfeeding support and encouragement to this population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247903
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.329
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.763
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLok, YWK-
dc.contributor.authorBai, L-
dc.contributor.authorChan, PT-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JYH-
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, AM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:34:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:34:32Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationBirth, 2018, v. 45 n. 1, p. 94-102-
dc.identifier.issn0730-7659-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247903-
dc.description.abstractBackground Researchers have found breastfeeding disparities between immigrant and native‐born women in many countries. However, most studies on immigration and breastfeeding practices have been in Western countries. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of length of time since immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants living in Hong Kong. Methods We recruited 2704 mother‐infant pairs from the postnatal wards of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. We examined the effect of migration status on the duration of any and exclusive breastfeeding. Results Breastfeeding duration was progressively shorter as the time since immigration increased. When compared with mothers who had lived in Hong Kong for <5 years, Hong Kong‐born participants had a 30% higher risk of stopping any breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] 1.34 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.10‐1.63]) and exclusive breastfeeding (HR 1.33 [95% CI 1.11‐1.58]). In both Hong Kong‐born and immigrant participants, breastfeeding cessation was associated with return to work postpartum and the husband's preference for infant formula or mixed feeding. Intention to exclusively breastfeed and to breastfeed for >6 months, and previous breastfeeding experience substantially reduced the risk of breastfeeding cessation for both Hong Kong‐born and immigrant participants. Conclusions Health care professionals should consider immigration history in their assessment of pregnant women and provide culturally adapted breastfeeding support and encouragement to this population.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1523-536X-
dc.relation.ispartofBirth-
dc.subjectAcculturation-
dc.subjectBreastfeeding-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectImmigrants-
dc.titleThe impact of immigration on the breastfeeding practices of Mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLok, YWK: krislok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, PT: nptchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, JYH: janetyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, AM: tarrantm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLok, YWK=rp02172-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, PT=rp01680-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, JYH=rp01561-
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, AM=rp00461-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/birt.12314-
dc.identifier.pmid28960460-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85030452709-
dc.identifier.hkuros281820-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage94-
dc.identifier.epage102-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000425126700013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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