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Conference Paper: Differential brainstem atrophy in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders among Hong Kong Chinese

TitleDifferential brainstem atrophy in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders among Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/
Citation
The 22nd Medical Research Conference (MRC 2017), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 14 January 2017. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2017, v. 23 n. 1, Suppl. 1, p. 29, abstract no. 39 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) are the most common inflammatory demyelinating disorders of central nervous system in Hong Kong. Brainstem is commonly involved in both disorders. We aimed to study the regional brainstem atrophy of local MS and NMOSD patients. Methods: Semi-automated segmentation and volumetric measurement of brainstem were performed and compared among MS, NMOSD, and healthy controls (HC). Clinical symptoms and severity were graded using Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Kurtzke Functional System Scores (FSS). Associations between the volumes of interest (VOIs) and clinical disability scores were assessed by partial correlation and multiple regression analyses. Results: Baseline characteristics were comparable across the three groups, without significant difference in disease duration and severity between MS and NMOSD subjects. Normalised whole brainstem, midbrain, and pons volumes were significantly smaller in MS subjects compared to HC (-5.2%, P=0.027; -8.3%, P=0.000; and -5.9%, P=0.048; respectively) while only the normalised medulla volume was significantly smaller in NMOSD subjects compared to HC (-8.5% vs HC, P=0.024). Normalised midbrain volume was significantly smaller in MS compared to NMOSD subjects (-5.0%, P=0.014) while normalised medulla volume was significantly smaller in NMOSD compared to MS subjects (-8.1%, P=0.032). Smaller normalised whole brainstem, pons, and medulla oblongata volumes were associated with greater disability on EDSS, FSS-brainstem, and FSS-cerebellar in NMOSD patients. Conclusion: Our findings revealed different patterns of brainstem atrophy between MS and NMOSD patients. This can be related to different underlying pathologies and pathophysiological mechanisms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247765
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.226
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, CY-
dc.contributor.authorMak, HKF-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PW-
dc.contributor.authorChang, HCC-
dc.contributor.authorBarkhof, F-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:32:18Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:32:18Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationThe 22nd Medical Research Conference (MRC 2017), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 14 January 2017. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2017, v. 23 n. 1, Suppl. 1, p. 29, abstract no. 39-
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247765-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) are the most common inflammatory demyelinating disorders of central nervous system in Hong Kong. Brainstem is commonly involved in both disorders. We aimed to study the regional brainstem atrophy of local MS and NMOSD patients. Methods: Semi-automated segmentation and volumetric measurement of brainstem were performed and compared among MS, NMOSD, and healthy controls (HC). Clinical symptoms and severity were graded using Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Kurtzke Functional System Scores (FSS). Associations between the volumes of interest (VOIs) and clinical disability scores were assessed by partial correlation and multiple regression analyses. Results: Baseline characteristics were comparable across the three groups, without significant difference in disease duration and severity between MS and NMOSD subjects. Normalised whole brainstem, midbrain, and pons volumes were significantly smaller in MS subjects compared to HC (-5.2%, P=0.027; -8.3%, P=0.000; and -5.9%, P=0.048; respectively) while only the normalised medulla volume was significantly smaller in NMOSD subjects compared to HC (-8.5% vs HC, P=0.024). Normalised midbrain volume was significantly smaller in MS compared to NMOSD subjects (-5.0%, P=0.014) while normalised medulla volume was significantly smaller in NMOSD compared to MS subjects (-8.1%, P=0.032). Smaller normalised whole brainstem, pons, and medulla oblongata volumes were associated with greater disability on EDSS, FSS-brainstem, and FSS-cerebellar in NMOSD patients. Conclusion: Our findings revealed different patterns of brainstem atrophy between MS and NMOSD patients. This can be related to different underlying pathologies and pathophysiological mechanisms.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleDifferential brainstem atrophy in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders among Hong Kong Chinese-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailMak, HKF: makkf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, PW: pwcchiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, HCC: hcchang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: koonho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMak, HKF=rp00533-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, HCC=rp02024-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KH=rp00537-
dc.identifier.hkuros281426-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue1, Suppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage29, abstract no. 39-
dc.identifier.epage29, abstract no. 39-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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