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Article: Requesting a unique personal identifier or providing a souvenir incentive did not affect overall consent to health record linkage: evidence from an RCT nested within a cohort

TitleRequesting a unique personal identifier or providing a souvenir incentive did not affect overall consent to health record linkage: evidence from an RCT nested within a cohort
Authors
KeywordsConsent
Data linkage
Health record linkage
Incentive
Randomized
Issue Date2017
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepi
Citation
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 2017, v. 84, p. 142-149 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: It is unclear if unique personal identifiers should be requested from participants for health record linkage: this permits high-quality data linkage but at the potential cost of lower consent rates due to privacy concerns. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Drawing from a sampling frame based on the FAMILY Cohort, using a 2 × 2 factorial design, we randomly assigned 1,200 participants to (1) request for Hong Kong Identity Card number (HKID) or no request and (2) receiving a souvenir incentive (valued at USD4) or no incentive. The primary outcome was consent to health record linkage. We also investigated associations between demographics, health status, and postal reminders with consent. RESULTS: Overall, we received signed consent forms from 33.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.6-36.0%) of respondents. We did not find an overall effect of requesting HKID (-4.3%, 95% CI -9.8% to 1.2%) or offering souvenir incentives (2.4%, 95% CI -3.1% to 7.9%) on consent to linkage. In subgroup analyses, requesting HKID significantly reduced consent among adults aged 18-44 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.53, 95% CI 0.30-0.94, compared to no request). Souvenir incentives increased consent among women (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.13-2.11, compared to no souvenirs). CONCLUSIONS: Requesting a unique personal identifier or providing a souvenir incentive did not affect overall consent to health record linkage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247074
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.245
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.559
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNi, MY-
dc.contributor.authorLi, KL-
dc.contributor.authorHui, RW-
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, I-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:21:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:21:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Epidemiology, 2017, v. 84, p. 142-149-
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247074-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: It is unclear if unique personal identifiers should be requested from participants for health record linkage: this permits high-quality data linkage but at the potential cost of lower consent rates due to privacy concerns. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Drawing from a sampling frame based on the FAMILY Cohort, using a 2 × 2 factorial design, we randomly assigned 1,200 participants to (1) request for Hong Kong Identity Card number (HKID) or no request and (2) receiving a souvenir incentive (valued at USD4) or no incentive. The primary outcome was consent to health record linkage. We also investigated associations between demographics, health status, and postal reminders with consent. RESULTS: Overall, we received signed consent forms from 33.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.6-36.0%) of respondents. We did not find an overall effect of requesting HKID (-4.3%, 95% CI -9.8% to 1.2%) or offering souvenir incentives (2.4%, 95% CI -3.1% to 7.9%) on consent to linkage. In subgroup analyses, requesting HKID significantly reduced consent among adults aged 18-44 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.53, 95% CI 0.30-0.94, compared to no request). Souvenir incentives increased consent among women (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.13-2.11, compared to no souvenirs). CONCLUSIONS: Requesting a unique personal identifier or providing a souvenir incentive did not affect overall consent to health record linkage.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepi-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Epidemiology-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectConsent-
dc.subjectData linkage-
dc.subjectHealth record linkage-
dc.subjectIncentive-
dc.subjectRandomized-
dc.titleRequesting a unique personal identifier or providing a souvenir incentive did not affect overall consent to health record linkage: evidence from an RCT nested within a cohort-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNi, MY: nimy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, KL: tomli123@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNi, MY=rp01639-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.01.003-
dc.identifier.pmid28115256-
dc.identifier.hkuros279370-
dc.identifier.volume84-
dc.identifier.spage142-
dc.identifier.epage149-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000402849500024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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