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Article: Markers of Bone Health, Bone-Specific Physical Activities, Nutritional Intake and Quality of Life of Professional Jockeys in Hong Kong

TitleMarkers of Bone Health, Bone-Specific Physical Activities, Nutritional Intake and Quality of Life of Professional Jockeys in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsBone Mineral Density
Horse Racing Jockeys
Nutrition
Physical Activity Habits
Weight Making
Issue Date2018
PublisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/products/journals/journal.cfm?id=IJSNEM
Citation
International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, 2018, v. 28 n. 4, p. 440-446 How to Cite?
AbstractWeight-making practices, regularly engaged in by horse racing jockeys, have been suggested to impair both physiological and mental health. This study aimed to assess bone health markers, nutritional intake, bone-specific physical activity (PA) habits, and quality of life of professional jockeys in Hong Kong (n = 14), with gender-, age-, and body mass index-matched controls (n = 14). Anthropometric measurements, serum hormonal biomarkers, bone mineral density, bone-specific PA habits, nutritional intake, and quality of life were assessed in all participants. The jockey group displayed significantly lower bone mineral density at both calcanei than the control group (left: 0.50 ± 0.06 vs.0.63 ± 0.07 g/cm2; right: 0.51 ± 0.07 vs.0.64 ± 0.10 g/cm2, both ps < .01). Thirteen of the 14 jockeys (93%) showed either osteopenia or osteoporosis in at least one of their calcanei. No significant difference in bone mineral density was detected for either forearm between the groups. The current bone-specific PA questionnaire score was lower in the jockey group than the control group (5.61 ± 1.82 vs. 8.27 ± 2.91, p < .05). Daily energy intake was lower in the jockeys than the controls (1,360 ± 515 vs. 1,985 ± 1,046 kcal/day, p < .01). No significant group difference was found for micronutrient intake assessed by the bone-specific food frequency questionnaire, blood hormonal markers, and quality of life scores. Our results revealed suboptimal bone conditions at calcanei and insufficient energy intake and bone-loading PAs among professional jockeys in Hong Kong compared with healthy age-, gender-, and body mass indexmatched controls. Further research is warranted to examine the effect of improved bone-loading PAs and nutritional habits on the musculoskeletal health of professional jockeys. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246919
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.489
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.036
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoon, ETC-
dc.contributor.authorOReilly, J-
dc.contributor.authorSheridan, S-
dc.contributor.authorCai, MM-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SHS-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:19:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:19:23Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, 2018, v. 28 n. 4, p. 440-446-
dc.identifier.issn1526-484X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246919-
dc.description.abstractWeight-making practices, regularly engaged in by horse racing jockeys, have been suggested to impair both physiological and mental health. This study aimed to assess bone health markers, nutritional intake, bone-specific physical activity (PA) habits, and quality of life of professional jockeys in Hong Kong (n = 14), with gender-, age-, and body mass index-matched controls (n = 14). Anthropometric measurements, serum hormonal biomarkers, bone mineral density, bone-specific PA habits, nutritional intake, and quality of life were assessed in all participants. The jockey group displayed significantly lower bone mineral density at both calcanei than the control group (left: 0.50 ± 0.06 vs.0.63 ± 0.07 g/cm2; right: 0.51 ± 0.07 vs.0.64 ± 0.10 g/cm2, both ps < .01). Thirteen of the 14 jockeys (93%) showed either osteopenia or osteoporosis in at least one of their calcanei. No significant difference in bone mineral density was detected for either forearm between the groups. The current bone-specific PA questionnaire score was lower in the jockey group than the control group (5.61 ± 1.82 vs. 8.27 ± 2.91, p < .05). Daily energy intake was lower in the jockeys than the controls (1,360 ± 515 vs. 1,985 ± 1,046 kcal/day, p < .01). No significant group difference was found for micronutrient intake assessed by the bone-specific food frequency questionnaire, blood hormonal markers, and quality of life scores. Our results revealed suboptimal bone conditions at calcanei and insufficient energy intake and bone-loading PAs among professional jockeys in Hong Kong compared with healthy age-, gender-, and body mass indexmatched controls. Further research is warranted to examine the effect of improved bone-loading PAs and nutritional habits on the musculoskeletal health of professional jockeys. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/products/journals/journal.cfm?id=IJSNEM-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. Copyright © Human Kinetics.-
dc.rightsAs accepted for publication-
dc.subjectBone Mineral Density-
dc.subjectHorse Racing Jockeys-
dc.subjectNutrition-
dc.subjectPhysical Activity Habits-
dc.subjectWeight Making-
dc.titleMarkers of Bone Health, Bone-Specific Physical Activities, Nutritional Intake and Quality of Life of Professional Jockeys in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSheridan, S: sineads@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijsnem.2016-0176-
dc.identifier.pmid28556673-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85051197671-
dc.identifier.hkuros279378-
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage440-
dc.identifier.epage446-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000440444600014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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