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Conference Paper: The Role of Learning in Construction Technology Transfer: A 'SCOT' Perspective

TitleThe Role of Learning in Construction Technology Transfer: A 'SCOT' Perspective
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherAssociation of Researchers in Construction. The Proceedings' web site is located at http://www.arcom.ac.uk/abstracts-browse.php?j=2#2
Citation
Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), Manchester, UK, 5-7 September 2016, v. 2, p. 699-708 How to Cite?
AbstractTechnology transfer has been given increasing importance since the formulation of the international code of conduct for technology transfer by the UNCTAD in 1985, and has become a preferred medium to bridge development gaps between developed and developing countries. In this development, international joint ventures have been but forward as vehicle for change in the belief that contractors in developing countries can position themselves to receive technology from their developed counterparts. So far, Technology Transfer has been studied through a variety of theoretical lenses. However, predominantly, the perspectives taken have assumed a linear process, viewing technology as an object and effectively disregarding the multiple social interactions that contribute to the process. In this paper, we argue that such perspectives only provide partial explanations of how technology is transferred across organisational boundaries, and that this has consequences for its broader uptake. A counter-argument is put forward to instead view Technology Transfer as a process of socio-technical interactions that is reliant on learning within a context. Adopting the theoretical lens of the Social Construction of Technological Systems (SCOT) as put forward by Bijker et al. (1987; 2012), we explicate the role learning plays in Technology Transfer in construction projects under IJV arrangements in developing countries. Drawing on an extensive literature review and the initial findings from case study research on oil and gas projects in Ghana, we show how the SCOT framework allows for examination of the socio-technical interactions between the human actors and the construction technology at hand. In particular, how the component of learning is an integral element of the construct of ‘closure and stabilisation’ under SCOT. Conclusions are drawn highlighting the importance of studying technology transfer as a product of socio-technical interactions within a context, in order to obtain a better understanding of the process.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246263
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOti-Sarpong, K-
dc.contributor.authorLeiringer, R-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T02:25:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T02:25:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), Manchester, UK, 5-7 September 2016, v. 2, p. 699-708-
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-9955463-0-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246263-
dc.description.abstractTechnology transfer has been given increasing importance since the formulation of the international code of conduct for technology transfer by the UNCTAD in 1985, and has become a preferred medium to bridge development gaps between developed and developing countries. In this development, international joint ventures have been but forward as vehicle for change in the belief that contractors in developing countries can position themselves to receive technology from their developed counterparts. So far, Technology Transfer has been studied through a variety of theoretical lenses. However, predominantly, the perspectives taken have assumed a linear process, viewing technology as an object and effectively disregarding the multiple social interactions that contribute to the process. In this paper, we argue that such perspectives only provide partial explanations of how technology is transferred across organisational boundaries, and that this has consequences for its broader uptake. A counter-argument is put forward to instead view Technology Transfer as a process of socio-technical interactions that is reliant on learning within a context. Adopting the theoretical lens of the Social Construction of Technological Systems (SCOT) as put forward by Bijker et al. (1987; 2012), we explicate the role learning plays in Technology Transfer in construction projects under IJV arrangements in developing countries. Drawing on an extensive literature review and the initial findings from case study research on oil and gas projects in Ghana, we show how the SCOT framework allows for examination of the socio-technical interactions between the human actors and the construction technology at hand. In particular, how the component of learning is an integral element of the construct of ‘closure and stabilisation’ under SCOT. Conclusions are drawn highlighting the importance of studying technology transfer as a product of socio-technical interactions within a context, in order to obtain a better understanding of the process.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAssociation of Researchers in Construction. The Proceedings' web site is located at http://www.arcom.ac.uk/abstracts-browse.php?j=2#2-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Annual ARCOM Conference, 2016-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License-
dc.titleThe Role of Learning in Construction Technology Transfer: A 'SCOT' Perspective-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLeiringer, RTF: roine.leiringer@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeiringer, RTF=rp01592-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros279061-
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.spage699-
dc.identifier.epage708-
dc.publisher.placeUK-

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