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Book Chapter: Sex trafficking and control

TitleSex trafficking and control
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherOxford University Press
Citation
Sex trafficking and control. In Sanders, T. (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Sex Offences and Sex Offenders, p. 606-624. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractThis essay examines the key characteristics and contradictions of the global problem of sex trafficking and the attendant policy approaches of trafficking control and protection. By drawing on examples from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Asia, the essay examines the competing assumptions of sex work and the problem of sex trafficking. The author interrogates the ways in which the dominant discourse has facilitated and justified the pursuit of particular counter-trafficking policies and paternalistic interventions by state and non-state agencies in the global North and South. The essay highlights some of the gendered and exclusionary consequences of contemporary sex trafficking control. The author also explores the human costs of the violent logic of global trafficking control.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245993
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, MSY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T02:20:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T02:20:29Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationSex trafficking and control. In Sanders, T. (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Sex Offences and Sex Offenders, p. 606-624. Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2017-
dc.identifier.isbn9780190213633-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245993-
dc.description.abstractThis essay examines the key characteristics and contradictions of the global problem of sex trafficking and the attendant policy approaches of trafficking control and protection. By drawing on examples from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Asia, the essay examines the competing assumptions of sex work and the problem of sex trafficking. The author interrogates the ways in which the dominant discourse has facilitated and justified the pursuit of particular counter-trafficking policies and paternalistic interventions by state and non-state agencies in the global North and South. The essay highlights some of the gendered and exclusionary consequences of contemporary sex trafficking control. The author also explores the human costs of the violent logic of global trafficking control.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Oxford Handbook of Sex Offences and Sex Offenders-
dc.titleSex trafficking and control-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailLee, MSY: leesym@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MSY=rp00562-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190213633.013.32-
dc.identifier.hkuros279022-
dc.identifier.spage606-
dc.identifier.epage624-
dc.publisher.placeOxford ; New York-

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