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Article: Two novel dromedary camel bocaparvoviruses from dromedaries in the Middle East with unique genomic features

TitleTwo novel dromedary camel bocaparvoviruses from dromedaries in the Middle East with unique genomic features
Authors
KeywordsBocaparvovirus
Genome
Dromedary camel
Phylogeny
Issue Date2017
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://vir.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal of General Virology, 2017, v. 98, p. 1349-1359 How to Cite?
AbstractThe recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus and its discovery from dromedary camels has boosted interest in the search for novel viruses in dromedaries. While bocaparvoviruses are known to infect various animals, it was not known that they exist in dromedaries. In this study, we describe the discovery of two novel dromedary camel bocaparvoviruses (DBoVs), DBoV1 and DBoV2, from dromedary faecal samples in Dubai. Among 667 adult dromedaries and 72 dromedary calves, 13.9 % of adult dromedaries and 33.3 % of dromedary calves were positive for DBoV1, while 7.0 % of adult dromedaries and 25.0 % of dromedary calves were positive for DBoV2, as determined by PCR. Sequencing of 21 DBoV1 and 18 DBoV2 genomes and phylogenetic analysis showed that DBoV1 and DBoV2 formed two distinct clusters, with only 32.6–36.3 % amino acid identities between the DBoV1 and DBoV2 strains. Quasispecies were detected in both DBoVs. The amino acid sequences of the NS1 proteins of all the DBoV1 and DBoV2 strains showed <85 % identity to those of all the other bocaparvoviruses, indicating that DBoV1 and DBoV2 are two bocaparvovirus species according to the ICTV criteria. Although the typical genome structure of NS1–NP1–VP1/VP2 was observed in DBoV1 and DBoV2, no phospholipase A2 motif and associated calcium binding site were observed in the predicted VP1 sequences for any of the 18 sequenced DBoV2, and no start codons were found for their VP1. For all 18 DBoV2 genomes, an AT-rich region of variable length and composition was present downstream to NP1. Further studies will be crucial to understand the pathogenic potential of DBoVs in this unique group of animals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245151
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.514
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.741
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY-
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP-
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, HW-
dc.contributor.authorPatteril, NG-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, C-
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, S-
dc.contributor.authorWong, YM-
dc.contributor.authorMuhammed, R-
dc.contributor.authorChow, WN-
dc.contributor.authorWernery, U-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T02:05:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T02:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of General Virology, 2017, v. 98, p. 1349-1359-
dc.identifier.issn0022-1317-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245151-
dc.description.abstractThe recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus and its discovery from dromedary camels has boosted interest in the search for novel viruses in dromedaries. While bocaparvoviruses are known to infect various animals, it was not known that they exist in dromedaries. In this study, we describe the discovery of two novel dromedary camel bocaparvoviruses (DBoVs), DBoV1 and DBoV2, from dromedary faecal samples in Dubai. Among 667 adult dromedaries and 72 dromedary calves, 13.9 % of adult dromedaries and 33.3 % of dromedary calves were positive for DBoV1, while 7.0 % of adult dromedaries and 25.0 % of dromedary calves were positive for DBoV2, as determined by PCR. Sequencing of 21 DBoV1 and 18 DBoV2 genomes and phylogenetic analysis showed that DBoV1 and DBoV2 formed two distinct clusters, with only 32.6–36.3 % amino acid identities between the DBoV1 and DBoV2 strains. Quasispecies were detected in both DBoVs. The amino acid sequences of the NS1 proteins of all the DBoV1 and DBoV2 strains showed <85 % identity to those of all the other bocaparvoviruses, indicating that DBoV1 and DBoV2 are two bocaparvovirus species according to the ICTV criteria. Although the typical genome structure of NS1–NP1–VP1/VP2 was observed in DBoV1 and DBoV2, no phospholipase A2 motif and associated calcium binding site were observed in the predicted VP1 sequences for any of the 18 sequenced DBoV2, and no start codons were found for their VP1. For all 18 DBoV2 genomes, an AT-rich region of variable length and composition was present downstream to NP1. Further studies will be crucial to understand the pathogenic potential of DBoVs in this unique group of animals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://vir.sgmjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of General Virology-
dc.rightsJournal of General Virology. Copyright © Society for General Microbiology.-
dc.rightsThis is an author manuscript that has been accepted for publication in [Journal Title], copyright Society for General Microbiology, but has not been copy-edited, formatted or proofed. Cite this article as appearing in [Journal Title]. This version of the manuscript may not be duplicated or reproduced, other than for personal use or within the rule of 'Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials' (section 17, Title 17, US Code), without permission from the copyright owner, Society for General Microbiology. The Society for General Microbiology disclaims any responsibility or liability for errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or in any version derived from it by any other parties. The final copy-edited, published article, which is the version of record, can be found at [Journal URL], and is freely available without a subscription.-
dc.subjectBocaparvovirus-
dc.subjectGenome-
dc.subjectDromedary camel-
dc.subjectPhylogeny-
dc.titleTwo novel dromedary camel bocaparvoviruses from dromedaries in the Middle East with unique genomic features-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsoi, HW: hwtsoi@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, YM: emilyhk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486-
dc.identifier.authorityTsoi, HW=rp00439-
dc.identifier.authorityChow, WN=rp02493-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jgv.0.000775-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85023645752-
dc.identifier.hkuros275905-
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.spage1349-
dc.identifier.epage1359-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000410020900024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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