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Article: Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus and dromedaries

TitleMiddle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus and dromedaries
Authors
KeywordsCoronavirus
Diagnosis
Dromedary
Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)
Issue Date2017
PublisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tvjl
Citation
The Veterinary Journal, 2017, v. 220, p. 75-79 How to Cite?
AbstractMiddle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a zoonotic viral disease that can be transmitted from dromedaries to human beings. More than 1500 cases of MERS have been reported in human beings to date. Although MERS has been associated with 30% case fatality in human beings, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in dromedaries is usually asymptomatic. In rare cases, dromedaries may develop mild respiratory signs. No MERS-CoV or antibodies against the virus have been detected in camelids other than dromedaries. MERS-CoV is mainly acquired in dromedaries when they are less than 1 year of age, and the proportion of seropositivity increases with age to a seroprevalence of 100% in adult dromedaries. Laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection in dromedaries can be achieved through virus isolation using Vero cells, RNA detection by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and antigen detection using respiratory specimens or serum. Rapid nucleocapsid antigen detection using a lateral flow platform allows efficient screening of dromedaries carrying MERS-CoV. In addition to MERS-CoV, which is a lineage C virus in the Betacoronavirus (betaCoV) genus, a lineage B betaCoV and a virus in the Alphacoronavirus (alphaCoV) genus have been detected in dromedaries. Dromedary CoV UAE-HKU23 is closely related to human CoV OC43, whereas the alphaCoV has not been detected in human beings to date.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245143
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.115
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.984
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWernery, U-
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T02:05:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T02:05:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationThe Veterinary Journal, 2017, v. 220, p. 75-79-
dc.identifier.issn1090-0233-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/245143-
dc.description.abstractMiddle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a zoonotic viral disease that can be transmitted from dromedaries to human beings. More than 1500 cases of MERS have been reported in human beings to date. Although MERS has been associated with 30% case fatality in human beings, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in dromedaries is usually asymptomatic. In rare cases, dromedaries may develop mild respiratory signs. No MERS-CoV or antibodies against the virus have been detected in camelids other than dromedaries. MERS-CoV is mainly acquired in dromedaries when they are less than 1 year of age, and the proportion of seropositivity increases with age to a seroprevalence of 100% in adult dromedaries. Laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection in dromedaries can be achieved through virus isolation using Vero cells, RNA detection by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and antigen detection using respiratory specimens or serum. Rapid nucleocapsid antigen detection using a lateral flow platform allows efficient screening of dromedaries carrying MERS-CoV. In addition to MERS-CoV, which is a lineage C virus in the Betacoronavirus (betaCoV) genus, a lineage B betaCoV and a virus in the Alphacoronavirus (alphaCoV) genus have been detected in dromedaries. Dromedary CoV UAE-HKU23 is closely related to human CoV OC43, whereas the alphaCoV has not been detected in human beings to date.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tvjl-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Veterinary Journal-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subjectCoronavirus-
dc.subjectDiagnosis-
dc.subjectDromedary-
dc.subjectMiddle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-
dc.titleMiddle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus and dromedaries-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486-
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tvjl.2016.12.020-
dc.identifier.pmid28190501-
dc.identifier.hkuros275893-
dc.identifier.volume220-
dc.identifier.spage75-
dc.identifier.epage79-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000395218400015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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