File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Evaluating hydrologic performance of bioretention cells in shallow groundwater

TitleEvaluating hydrologic performance of bioretention cells in shallow groundwater
Authors
Keywordsbioretention
low impact development
shallow groundwater
sponge city
stormwater management
Issue Date2017
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4125
Citation
Hydrological Processes, 2017, v. 31 n. 23, p. 4122-4135 How to Cite?
AbstractBioretention cells, which are generally effective in controlling surface runoff and recharging groundwater, have been widely adopted as low impact development practices. However, shallow groundwater has limited their implementation in some locations due to the potential problems of a reduction in surface runoff control, groundwater pollution, and continuous groundwater drainage through the underdrain. Many guidelines have established minimum requirements for the groundwater depth below bioretention cells, but they may not be optimized for certain environmental conditions and bioretention cell designs. This study made use of a variably saturated flow model to examine the hydrologic performance of a single bioretention cell in shallow groundwater with event-based simulations, considering a wide range of initial groundwater depths, media and in situ soil types, surface runoff loads, and underdrain sizes. Performance indicators (e.g., runoff reduction, time for infiltrated water to reach the bioretention cell bottom and the groundwater table, and height and dissipation time of groundwater mound) were evaluated to examine the processes of runoff generation, the formation and dissipation of groundwater mounds, and the bioretention cell's performance in a shallow groundwater environment. The most influential factors were the initial groundwater depth, the hydraulic conductivity of the media soil, and the rainfall runoff load. With a deeper initial groundwater table, infiltrated water took longer to reach the bioretention cell bottom and groundwater table. Groundwater mounds, however, took longer to dissipate even though they were smaller. The groundwater quality can be better protected if relatively less-permeable soil types (e.g., sandy loam) are used as the media, although it may compromise the performance in runoff quantity control. However, only very high surface runoff loads would cause concerns regarding a reduction in runoff quantity control and possible groundwater contamination due to the shallow groundwater. A distance of 1.5–3 m between the bioretention cell bottom and the groundwater table is generally sufficient. The results of this study could help to guide the planning and design of bioretention cells in areas of shallow groundwater. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244826
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.181
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.419
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, K-
dc.contributor.authorChui, TFM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T01:59:45Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T01:59:45Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationHydrological Processes, 2017, v. 31 n. 23, p. 4122-4135-
dc.identifier.issn0885-6087-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244826-
dc.description.abstractBioretention cells, which are generally effective in controlling surface runoff and recharging groundwater, have been widely adopted as low impact development practices. However, shallow groundwater has limited their implementation in some locations due to the potential problems of a reduction in surface runoff control, groundwater pollution, and continuous groundwater drainage through the underdrain. Many guidelines have established minimum requirements for the groundwater depth below bioretention cells, but they may not be optimized for certain environmental conditions and bioretention cell designs. This study made use of a variably saturated flow model to examine the hydrologic performance of a single bioretention cell in shallow groundwater with event-based simulations, considering a wide range of initial groundwater depths, media and in situ soil types, surface runoff loads, and underdrain sizes. Performance indicators (e.g., runoff reduction, time for infiltrated water to reach the bioretention cell bottom and the groundwater table, and height and dissipation time of groundwater mound) were evaluated to examine the processes of runoff generation, the formation and dissipation of groundwater mounds, and the bioretention cell's performance in a shallow groundwater environment. The most influential factors were the initial groundwater depth, the hydraulic conductivity of the media soil, and the rainfall runoff load. With a deeper initial groundwater table, infiltrated water took longer to reach the bioretention cell bottom and groundwater table. Groundwater mounds, however, took longer to dissipate even though they were smaller. The groundwater quality can be better protected if relatively less-permeable soil types (e.g., sandy loam) are used as the media, although it may compromise the performance in runoff quantity control. However, only very high surface runoff loads would cause concerns regarding a reduction in runoff quantity control and possible groundwater contamination due to the shallow groundwater. A distance of 1.5–3 m between the bioretention cell bottom and the groundwater table is generally sufficient. The results of this study could help to guide the planning and design of bioretention cells in areas of shallow groundwater. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4125-
dc.relation.ispartofHydrological Processes-
dc.subjectbioretention-
dc.subjectlow impact development-
dc.subjectshallow groundwater-
dc.subjectsponge city-
dc.subjectstormwater management-
dc.titleEvaluating hydrologic performance of bioretention cells in shallow groundwater-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChui, TFM: maychui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChui, TFM=rp01696-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hyp.11308-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85031317627-
dc.identifier.hkuros276397-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue23-
dc.identifier.spage4122-
dc.identifier.epage4135-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000414389600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats