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Article: Examining common information technology addictions and their relationships with non-technology-related addictions

TitleExamining common information technology addictions and their relationships with non-technology-related addictions
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comphumbeh
Citation
Computers in Human Behavior, 2017, v. 75, p. 520-526 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of novel problematic behaviors have emerged in the information technology era, and corresponding addictions have been proposed for some of these behaviors. Scholars have speculated that a common factor may underlie these information technology addictions, but this theoretical notion has yet to be tested empirically. The present study tested this notion and also investigated the relationships of information technology addictions with other behavioral addictions as well as substance addictions. We conducted an online survey in 1001 US adults (56% female; mean age = 35.0 years, range = 18–83). Two conceptual models were formulated and tested. Moreover, correlations of the information technology addictions with both problematic gambling and alcohol use disorder were examined. The confirmatory factor analysis showed that there was a common factor underlying various types of information technology addiction. In addition, problematic gambling was more strongly correlated with information technology addiction than alcohol use disorder was. Our findings are interpreted in light of a spectrum approach, which conceptualizes information technology addiction as a cluster of disorders comprising not only shared risk factors and symptoms but also distinct characteristics. The findings further reveal that information technology addiction is more similar to other behavioral addictions than substance-related addictions. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244733
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.646
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSigerson, L-
dc.contributor.authorLi, AYL-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MWL-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, C-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T01:58:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T01:58:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationComputers in Human Behavior, 2017, v. 75, p. 520-526-
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244733-
dc.description.abstractA number of novel problematic behaviors have emerged in the information technology era, and corresponding addictions have been proposed for some of these behaviors. Scholars have speculated that a common factor may underlie these information technology addictions, but this theoretical notion has yet to be tested empirically. The present study tested this notion and also investigated the relationships of information technology addictions with other behavioral addictions as well as substance addictions. We conducted an online survey in 1001 US adults (56% female; mean age = 35.0 years, range = 18–83). Two conceptual models were formulated and tested. Moreover, correlations of the information technology addictions with both problematic gambling and alcohol use disorder were examined. The confirmatory factor analysis showed that there was a common factor underlying various types of information technology addiction. In addition, problematic gambling was more strongly correlated with information technology addiction than alcohol use disorder was. Our findings are interpreted in light of a spectrum approach, which conceptualizes information technology addiction as a cluster of disorders comprising not only shared risk factors and symptoms but also distinct characteristics. The findings further reveal that information technology addiction is more similar to other behavioral addictions than substance-related addictions. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comphumbeh-
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behavior-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleExamining common information technology addictions and their relationships with non-technology-related addictions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C: ceccheng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.041-
dc.identifier.hkuros277291-
dc.identifier.volume75-
dc.identifier.spage520-
dc.identifier.epage526-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000407186500052-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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