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Article: Controlling for selection effects in the relationship between child behavior problems and exposure to intimate partner violence

TitleControlling for selection effects in the relationship between child behavior problems and exposure to intimate partner violence
Authors
Keywordsselection effects
intimate partner violence
child behavior problems
Issue Date2011
Citation
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 2011, v. 26, n. 8, p. 1541-1558 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article used the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) data to examine the relationship between exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) and child behavior problems (externalizing and internalizing), truancy, grade repetition, smoking, drinking, and use of marijuana. Longitudinal data analysis was conducted on 1,816 primary caregivers and their children. Fixed-effects regression models were employed to address concerns with selection bias. IPV was associated with significantly greater internalizing behavior, externalizing behavior, and truancy. Findings from age interaction models suggested that the relationship between IPV and child behavior problems may attenuate as the age of the child at time of exposure increases. © The Author(s) 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244118
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.579
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.064

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEmery, Clifton R.-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T08:56:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-31T08:56:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Interpersonal Violence, 2011, v. 26, n. 8, p. 1541-1558-
dc.identifier.issn0886-2605-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244118-
dc.description.abstractThis article used the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) data to examine the relationship between exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) and child behavior problems (externalizing and internalizing), truancy, grade repetition, smoking, drinking, and use of marijuana. Longitudinal data analysis was conducted on 1,816 primary caregivers and their children. Fixed-effects regression models were employed to address concerns with selection bias. IPV was associated with significantly greater internalizing behavior, externalizing behavior, and truancy. Findings from age interaction models suggested that the relationship between IPV and child behavior problems may attenuate as the age of the child at time of exposure increases. © The Author(s) 2011.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Interpersonal Violence-
dc.subjectselection effects-
dc.subjectintimate partner violence-
dc.subjectchild behavior problems-
dc.titleControlling for selection effects in the relationship between child behavior problems and exposure to intimate partner violence-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0886260510370597-
dc.identifier.pmid20587450-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955073336-
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1541-
dc.identifier.epage1558-
dc.identifier.eissn1552-6518-

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