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Article: Examining an extension of Johnson's hypothesis: Is Male perpetrated intimate partner violence more underreported than Female violence?

TitleExamining an extension of Johnson's hypothesis: Is Male perpetrated intimate partner violence more underreported than Female violence?
Authors
KeywordsMissing data
Domestic violence
Intimate partner violence
Multiple imputation
Issue Date2010
Citation
Journal of Family Violence, 2010, v. 25, n. 2, p. 173-181 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines two hypotheses about under-reporting in intimate partner violence data. The first hypothesis holds that significant amounts of under-reporting of intimate partner violence occur due to stigma. The second examines the empirical evidence behind Johnson's (Journal of Marriage and the Family 57:238-294, 1995) contention that controversial findings of equal rates of intimate partner violence perpetration among men and women occur through a combination of heterogeneity in type of intimate partner violence and missing data. E. M. and Data Augmentation are used to correct for item non-response in the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Strong support is found for general under-reporting; weak support is found for greater under-reporting of male violence. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244105
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.767
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.639

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEmery, Clifton R.-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T08:56:04Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-31T08:56:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Violence, 2010, v. 25, n. 2, p. 173-181-
dc.identifier.issn0885-7482-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/244105-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines two hypotheses about under-reporting in intimate partner violence data. The first hypothesis holds that significant amounts of under-reporting of intimate partner violence occur due to stigma. The second examines the empirical evidence behind Johnson's (Journal of Marriage and the Family 57:238-294, 1995) contention that controversial findings of equal rates of intimate partner violence perpetration among men and women occur through a combination of heterogeneity in type of intimate partner violence and missing data. E. M. and Data Augmentation are used to correct for item non-response in the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Strong support is found for general under-reporting; weak support is found for greater under-reporting of male violence. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Family Violence-
dc.subjectMissing data-
dc.subjectDomestic violence-
dc.subjectIntimate partner violence-
dc.subjectMultiple imputation-
dc.titleExamining an extension of Johnson's hypothesis: Is Male perpetrated intimate partner violence more underreported than Female violence?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10896-009-9281-0-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951206224-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage173-
dc.identifier.epage181-

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