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Article: Don't Want to Look Dumb? The Role of Theories of Intelligence and Humanlike Features in Online Help Seeking

TitleDon't Want to Look Dumb? The Role of Theories of Intelligence and Humanlike Features in Online Help Seeking
Authors
Keywordsanthropomorphism
help seeking
online learning
open data
open materials
Issue Date2017
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://pss.sagepub.com
Citation
Psychological Science, 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractNumerous studies have shown that individuals' help-seeking behavior increases when a computerized helper is endowed with humanlike features in nonachievement contexts. In contrast, the current research suggests that anthropomorphic helpers are not universally conducive to help-seeking behavior in contexts of achievement, particularly among individuals who construe help seeking as a display of incompetence (i.e., entity theorists). Study 1 demonstrated that when entity theorists received help from an anthropomorphized (vs. a nonanthropomorphized) helper, they were more concerned about negative judgments from other people, whereas incremental theorists were not affected by anthropomorphic features. Study 2 showed that when help was provided by an anthropomorphized (vs. a nonanthropomorphized) helper, entity theorists were less likely to seek help, even at the cost of lower performance. In contrast, incremental theorists' help-seeking behavior and task performance were not affected by anthropomorphism. This research deepens the current understanding of the role of anthropomorphic computerized helpers in online learning contexts.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243224
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 6.128
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.375
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKim, S-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, K-
dc.contributor.authorPark, D-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T02:51:52Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-25T02:51:52Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Science, 2017-
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243224-
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have shown that individuals' help-seeking behavior increases when a computerized helper is endowed with humanlike features in nonachievement contexts. In contrast, the current research suggests that anthropomorphic helpers are not universally conducive to help-seeking behavior in contexts of achievement, particularly among individuals who construe help seeking as a display of incompetence (i.e., entity theorists). Study 1 demonstrated that when entity theorists received help from an anthropomorphized (vs. a nonanthropomorphized) helper, they were more concerned about negative judgments from other people, whereas incremental theorists were not affected by anthropomorphic features. Study 2 showed that when help was provided by an anthropomorphized (vs. a nonanthropomorphized) helper, entity theorists were less likely to seek help, even at the cost of lower performance. In contrast, incremental theorists' help-seeking behavior and task performance were not affected by anthropomorphism. This research deepens the current understanding of the role of anthropomorphic computerized helpers in online learning contexts.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://pss.sagepub.com-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Science-
dc.rightsPsychological Science. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectanthropomorphism-
dc.subjecthelp seeking-
dc.subjectonline learning-
dc.subjectopen data-
dc.subjectopen materials-
dc.titleDon't Want to Look Dumb? The Role of Theories of Intelligence and Humanlike Features in Online Help Seeking-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKim, S: sarakim@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKim, S=rp01613-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0956797617730595-
dc.identifier.pmid29240519-
dc.identifier.hkuros275118-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000425042900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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