File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Spontaneously Reported Symptoms by Informants Are Associated with Clinical Severity in Dementia Help-Seekers

TitleSpontaneously Reported Symptoms by Informants Are Associated with Clinical Severity in Dementia Help-Seekers
Authors
Keywordscognitive impairment
dementia
spontaneously reported symptoms
symptom classification
triage
Issue Date2017
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291532-5415
Citation
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2017, v. 65 n. 9, p. 1946-1952 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives To investigate the predictive value of symptoms of dementia that the person or an informant noticed spontaneously in determining the clinical severity of dementia. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Community-based open-referral dementia assessment service in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2013. Participants Help-seekers for dementia assessment service and their informants (N = 965 dyads). Measurements Participants underwent a clinical dementia interview based on the Clinical Dementia Rating. Spontaneous complaints that the person and the informant made that had prompted their help-seeking of groups with interview results suggestive of no impairment, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia were compared. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the predictive value of spontaneous complaints for clinical severity. Independent raters blinded to clinical results coded spontaneously reported symptoms into theoretical themes: memory, executive function, language, time and place orientation, neuropsychiatric, mood, and avolition. Results Memory problems were the most frequently reported complaints for participants (87.7%) and their informants (95.5%), followed by self-reported language (33.0%) and informant-reported orientation (33.0%) difficulties. Informant-reported but not self-reported symptoms predicted clinical severity. Compared with the persons themselves, informants reported more pervasive symptoms corresponding to clinical severity. Persons with dementia self-reported fewer types of symptoms than their healthy or mildly impaired counterparts. Spontaneously reported language and orientation symptoms by the informant distinguished persons with mild or worse dementia (P < .001, Nagelkerke coefficient of determination = 29.7%, percentage correct 85.6%). Conclusion The type and pervasiveness of symptoms spontaneously that informants reported predicted clinical severity. This may provide a quick reference for triage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242487
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.155
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.236
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, J-
dc.contributor.authorChoy, CPJ-
dc.contributor.authorTang, YMJ-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, T-
dc.contributor.authorLuo, H-
dc.contributor.authorLou, VW-
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYS-
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T01:40:25Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-24T01:40:25Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2017, v. 65 n. 9, p. 1946-1952-
dc.identifier.issn0002-8614-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242487-
dc.description.abstractObjectives To investigate the predictive value of symptoms of dementia that the person or an informant noticed spontaneously in determining the clinical severity of dementia. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Community-based open-referral dementia assessment service in Hong Kong between 2005 and 2013. Participants Help-seekers for dementia assessment service and their informants (N = 965 dyads). Measurements Participants underwent a clinical dementia interview based on the Clinical Dementia Rating. Spontaneous complaints that the person and the informant made that had prompted their help-seeking of groups with interview results suggestive of no impairment, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia were compared. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the predictive value of spontaneous complaints for clinical severity. Independent raters blinded to clinical results coded spontaneously reported symptoms into theoretical themes: memory, executive function, language, time and place orientation, neuropsychiatric, mood, and avolition. Results Memory problems were the most frequently reported complaints for participants (87.7%) and their informants (95.5%), followed by self-reported language (33.0%) and informant-reported orientation (33.0%) difficulties. Informant-reported but not self-reported symptoms predicted clinical severity. Compared with the persons themselves, informants reported more pervasive symptoms corresponding to clinical severity. Persons with dementia self-reported fewer types of symptoms than their healthy or mildly impaired counterparts. Spontaneously reported language and orientation symptoms by the informant distinguished persons with mild or worse dementia (P < .001, Nagelkerke coefficient of determination = 29.7%, percentage correct 85.6%). Conclusion The type and pervasiveness of symptoms spontaneously that informants reported predicted clinical severity. This may provide a quick reference for triage.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291532-5415-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Geriatrics Society-
dc.subjectcognitive impairment-
dc.subjectdementia-
dc.subjectspontaneously reported symptoms-
dc.subjectsymptom classification-
dc.subjecttriage-
dc.titleSpontaneously Reported Symptoms by Informants Are Associated with Clinical Severity in Dementia Help-Seekers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, J: meloxu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChoy, CPJ: cpchoy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTang, YMJ: jennitym@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, T: tianyin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuo, H: haoluo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLou, VW: wlou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLum, TYS: tlum@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, GHY: ghywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, YMJ=rp01997-
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, T=rp02466-
dc.identifier.authorityLuo, H=rp02317-
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VW=rp00607-
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TYS=rp01513-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, GHY=rp01850-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jgs.14931-
dc.identifier.pmid28481449-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85018409692-
dc.identifier.hkuros273284-
dc.identifier.volume65-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage1946-
dc.identifier.epage1952-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000411060500015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats