File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Budget impact and cost-effectiveness analyses of direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Hong Kong

TitleBudget impact and cost-effectiveness analyses of direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2017
Citation
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the budget impact and cost-effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Hong Kong. A decision analytic model was developed to compare short-term costs and health outcomes of patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection in Hong Kong who were treated with an interferon (INF)-based treatment (dual therapy of pegylated interferon and ribavirin) or DAA-based treatments (sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir or ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir plus dasabuvir). Compared to INF-based treatment, DAA-based treatments yielded an incremental cost of $24,677–$31,171 per course while improving the rate of sustained virologic response (SVR) from 59–66% to 82.3–99.8%. The incremental cost-effective ratios of DAA-based treatments ranged from $9724 to $29,189 per treatment success, which were all below the cost-effectiveness threshold of local GDP per capita ($42,423 in 2015). Introducing DAAs resulted in a 126.1% ($383.7 million) budget increase on HCV infection management over 5 years. A 50% change in DAA medication costs reflected a change in the incremental budget from $55.2 to $712.3 million. DAA-based treatments are cost-effective alternatives to INF-based treatment in Hong Kong. Introducing DAAs to the public hospital formulary yields a considerable budget increase but is still economically favorable to the local government.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241776

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, X-
dc.contributor.authorChan, NS-
dc.contributor.authorTam, AW-
dc.contributor.authorHung, FNI-
dc.contributor.authorChan, EW-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:48:25Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:48:25Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 2017-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241776-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the budget impact and cost-effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Hong Kong. A decision analytic model was developed to compare short-term costs and health outcomes of patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection in Hong Kong who were treated with an interferon (INF)-based treatment (dual therapy of pegylated interferon and ribavirin) or DAA-based treatments (sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir or ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir plus dasabuvir). Compared to INF-based treatment, DAA-based treatments yielded an incremental cost of $24,677–$31,171 per course while improving the rate of sustained virologic response (SVR) from 59–66% to 82.3–99.8%. The incremental cost-effective ratios of DAA-based treatments ranged from $9724 to $29,189 per treatment success, which were all below the cost-effectiveness threshold of local GDP per capita ($42,423 in 2015). Introducing DAAs resulted in a 126.1% ($383.7 million) budget increase on HCV infection management over 5 years. A 50% change in DAA medication costs reflected a change in the incremental budget from $55.2 to $712.3 million. DAA-based treatments are cost-effective alternatives to INF-based treatment in Hong Kong. Introducing DAAs to the public hospital formulary yields a considerable budget increase but is still economically favorable to the local government.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases-
dc.titleBudget impact and cost-effectiveness analyses of direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLi, X: sxueli@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTam, AW: awtam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHung, FNI: ivanhung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, EW: ewchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHung, FNI=rp00508-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, EW=rp01587-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10096-017-2995-7-
dc.identifier.hkuros272573-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats