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Conference Paper: Visual working memory deterioration preceding relapse in psychosis

TitleVisual working memory deterioration preceding relapse in psychosis
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1751-7893
Citation
IEPA 10th International Conference on Early Intervention in Mental Health: Looking Back, Moving Forward, Milan, Italy, 20–22 October 2016. In Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2016, v. 10 n. Suppl. 1, p. 165 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Relapse is common after the first episode of psychosis and can have potentially irreversible consequences, yet it is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Examining changes in cognitive function preceding relapse may be useful in enriching our understanding towards the underlying mechanism of psychotic relapse. It is hypothesized that relapse in fully remitted first-episode psychosis patients was preceded by working memory deterioration. Method: Visual and verbal working memory were monitored prospectively in a 1-year randomized controlled trial of remitted first-episode psychosis patients assigned to medication continuation (quetiapine 400 mg/d) or discontinuation (placebo). Relapse (recurrence of positive symptoms of psychosis), visual (Visual Patterns Test) and verbal (Letter-Number Span Test) working memory, and stressful life events were assessed monthly. Results: One hundred and two remitted first-episode patients participated in the study (relapsers=53 and non-relapsers=49). Logistic regression analyses showed that relapse was associated with visual working memory deterioration 2 months before relapse (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07; 95% CI, 1.19-7.92; P = 0.02), more stressful life events 1 month before relapse (OR = 2.11, 95% CI, 1.20-3.72; P = 0.01), and medication discontinuation (OR = 5.52; 95% CI, 2.08-14.62; P = 0.001). Conclusions: We found that visual working memory deterioration beginning 2 months before relapse in remitted first-episode psychosis patients may reflect early brain dysfunction that heralds a psychotic relapse. The observed cognitive deterioration also occurred independent of any change in psychopathology prior to relapse. Testable predictors of relapse would be an important addition to the long-term management of patients with psychosis.
DescriptionPoster Session B: Neurocognition - abstract no. B29
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241725
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.923
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.071

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorLi, YK-
dc.contributor.authorLi, AWY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorLam, SY-
dc.contributor.authorThornton, AE-
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC-
dc.contributor.authorHoner, WG-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:47:42Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:47:42Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationIEPA 10th International Conference on Early Intervention in Mental Health: Looking Back, Moving Forward, Milan, Italy, 20–22 October 2016. In Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2016, v. 10 n. Suppl. 1, p. 165-
dc.identifier.issn1751-7885-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241725-
dc.descriptionPoster Session B: Neurocognition - abstract no. B29-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Relapse is common after the first episode of psychosis and can have potentially irreversible consequences, yet it is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Examining changes in cognitive function preceding relapse may be useful in enriching our understanding towards the underlying mechanism of psychotic relapse. It is hypothesized that relapse in fully remitted first-episode psychosis patients was preceded by working memory deterioration. Method: Visual and verbal working memory were monitored prospectively in a 1-year randomized controlled trial of remitted first-episode psychosis patients assigned to medication continuation (quetiapine 400 mg/d) or discontinuation (placebo). Relapse (recurrence of positive symptoms of psychosis), visual (Visual Patterns Test) and verbal (Letter-Number Span Test) working memory, and stressful life events were assessed monthly. Results: One hundred and two remitted first-episode patients participated in the study (relapsers=53 and non-relapsers=49). Logistic regression analyses showed that relapse was associated with visual working memory deterioration 2 months before relapse (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07; 95% CI, 1.19-7.92; P = 0.02), more stressful life events 1 month before relapse (OR = 2.11, 95% CI, 1.20-3.72; P = 0.01), and medication discontinuation (OR = 5.52; 95% CI, 2.08-14.62; P = 0.001). Conclusions: We found that visual working memory deterioration beginning 2 months before relapse in remitted first-episode psychosis patients may reflect early brain dysfunction that heralds a psychotic relapse. The observed cognitive deterioration also occurred independent of any change in psychopathology prior to relapse. Testable predictors of relapse would be an important addition to the long-term management of patients with psychosis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1751-7893-
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Intervention in Psychiatry-
dc.titleVisual working memory deterioration preceding relapse in psychosis-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, YK: garyjcep@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, AWY: awyli@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, SY: szeying@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eip.12397-
dc.identifier.hkuros272719-
dc.identifier.hkuros272768-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage165-
dc.identifier.epage165-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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