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Conference Paper: Focus perception in Japanese: Effects of focus location and accent condition

TitleFocus perception in Japanese: Effects of focus location and accent condition
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherAcoustical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://scitation.aip.org/POMA
Citation
The 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA 2016), Honolulu, HI., 28 November-2 December 2016. In Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, 2016, v. 29 n. 1, article no. 060007, p. 1-11 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study explores the contexts in which native Japanese listeners have difficulty identifying prosodic focus. Theories of intonational phonology, syntax, and phonetics make different predictions as to which focus location would be the most challenging to the native listener. Lexical pitch accent further complicates this picture. In a sentence with mixed pitch accent conditions (e.g. Unaccented-Accented-Unaccented), the lexical accent would naturally stand out as more prominent than the unaccented words in terms of modifications to the F0 contour, thus potentially resembling focus. A focus identification task was conducted with 16 native listeners from the Greater Tokyo area. Natural and synthetic stimuli were played to the listeners who then chose which word of the sentence was under focus. Neutral (or broad) focus was also an option. Stimuli contrasted in accent condition and focus location. Results showed a highly complex interplay between these two factors. For example, accented narrow foci were always more correctly identified (51%) than unaccented ones (28%), whereas the identification rate for final focus was the lowest (31%) among all focus locations. These results are discussed with reference to the research literature on focus production and formal representation of intonation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/240859
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, KLA-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, F-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T09:18:20Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-22T09:18:20Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA 2016), Honolulu, HI., 28 November-2 December 2016. In Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, 2016, v. 29 n. 1, article no. 060007, p. 1-11-
dc.identifier.issn1939-800X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/240859-
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the contexts in which native Japanese listeners have difficulty identifying prosodic focus. Theories of intonational phonology, syntax, and phonetics make different predictions as to which focus location would be the most challenging to the native listener. Lexical pitch accent further complicates this picture. In a sentence with mixed pitch accent conditions (e.g. Unaccented-Accented-Unaccented), the lexical accent would naturally stand out as more prominent than the unaccented words in terms of modifications to the F0 contour, thus potentially resembling focus. A focus identification task was conducted with 16 native listeners from the Greater Tokyo area. Natural and synthetic stimuli were played to the listeners who then chose which word of the sentence was under focus. Neutral (or broad) focus was also an option. Stimuli contrasted in accent condition and focus location. Results showed a highly complex interplay between these two factors. For example, accented narrow foci were always more correctly identified (51%) than unaccented ones (28%), whereas the identification rate for final focus was the lowest (31%) among all focus locations. These results are discussed with reference to the research literature on focus production and formal representation of intonation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://scitation.aip.org/POMA-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics-
dc.rightsCopyright 2017 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America. The following article appeared in Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, 2016, v. 29 n. 1, article no. 060007 and may be found at https://doi.org/10.1121/2.0000441-
dc.titleFocus perception in Japanese: Effects of focus location and accent condition-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLee, KLA: albertlee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, KLA=rp02091-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/2.0000441-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85044177744-
dc.identifier.hkuros272413-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 060007, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 060007, p. 11-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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