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Conference Paper: Universal vs. language-specific aspects in human vocal attractiveness: an investigation towards Japanese native listeners' perceptual pattern

TitleUniversal vs. language-specific aspects in human vocal attractiveness: an investigation towards Japanese native listeners' perceptual pattern
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherAcoustical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://asa.aip.org/jasa.html
Citation
The 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA 2016) - the 5th Joint Meeting with The Acoustical Society of Japan (ASJ), Honolulu, HI., 28 November-2 December 2016. In Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2016, v. 140 n. 4 pt. 2, p. 3401, abstract no. 5aSC51 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies on Western societies show that male voices with acoustic parameters encoding a big body size (low F0, narrow formant dispersion, and F0 range) were considered to be attractive, while the opposite was true for female voices (e.g., [Xu et al., 2013, PLoS ONE, 8(4), e62397]). The present work investigates whether Japanese native listeners are guided by the same principles in assessing the voices of the opposite sex. We replicated the design in Xu et al. (2013) with the added parameter of creaky voice, which is prevalent in North America nowadays and hotly debated in terms of attractiveness. Thirty-four heterosexual participants (16 female) rated the attractiveness of synthetic stimuli controlling for F0 height, formant distribution, F0 range and voice quality. Results indicate that their preferences for voice quality are similar with studies on Western societies (breathy > modal >creaky >pressed/tensed). Additionally, low-pitched male voice with narrow formant dispersion and high-pitched female voices were also favorable. Interestingly, a narrow F0 range significantly lowered the attractiveness ratings, regardless of the gender of the voice, which contradicts Xu et al. (2013). These various results are discussed in light of the cross-linguistic/cross-ethnic divergences in vocal attractiveness.
DescriptionThis journal issue contain abstracts of the 5th ASA/ASJ Joint Meeting
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/240138
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.572
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, A-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SS-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T03:18:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-13T03:18:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA 2016) - the 5th Joint Meeting with The Acoustical Society of Japan (ASJ), Honolulu, HI., 28 November-2 December 2016. In Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2016, v. 140 n. 4 pt. 2, p. 3401, abstract no. 5aSC51-
dc.identifier.issn0001-4966-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/240138-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue contain abstracts of the 5th ASA/ASJ Joint Meeting-
dc.description.abstractStudies on Western societies show that male voices with acoustic parameters encoding a big body size (low F0, narrow formant dispersion, and F0 range) were considered to be attractive, while the opposite was true for female voices (e.g., [Xu et al., 2013, PLoS ONE, 8(4), e62397]). The present work investigates whether Japanese native listeners are guided by the same principles in assessing the voices of the opposite sex. We replicated the design in Xu et al. (2013) with the added parameter of creaky voice, which is prevalent in North America nowadays and hotly debated in terms of attractiveness. Thirty-four heterosexual participants (16 female) rated the attractiveness of synthetic stimuli controlling for F0 height, formant distribution, F0 range and voice quality. Results indicate that their preferences for voice quality are similar with studies on Western societies (breathy > modal >creaky >pressed/tensed). Additionally, low-pitched male voice with narrow formant dispersion and high-pitched female voices were also favorable. Interestingly, a narrow F0 range significantly lowered the attractiveness ratings, regardless of the gender of the voice, which contradicts Xu et al. (2013). These various results are discussed in light of the cross-linguistic/cross-ethnic divergences in vocal attractiveness.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://asa.aip.org/jasa.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Acoustical Society of America-
dc.rightsJournal of the Acoustical Society of America. Copyright © Acoustical Society of America.-
dc.rightsCopyright (2016) Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America. along with the following message: The following article appeared in (citation of published article) and may be found at (URL/link for published article abstract). Prior to publication by ASA, the notice should state: The following article has been submitted to/accepted by [Name of Journal]. After it is published, it will be found at (URL/link to the entry page of the journal. For JASA: http://scitation.aip.org/JASA; for JASA Express Letters: http://scitation.aip.org/JASA-EL; for Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: http://scitation.aip.org/POMA.-
dc.titleUniversal vs. language-specific aspects in human vocal attractiveness: an investigation towards Japanese native listeners' perceptual pattern-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/1.4970911-
dc.identifier.hkuros271865-
dc.identifier.volume140-
dc.identifier.issue4 pt. 2-
dc.identifier.spage3401, abstract no. 5aSC51-
dc.identifier.epage3401, abstract no. 5aSC51-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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