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Article: Patterns of added sugars intake by eating occasion among a nationally representative sample of Australians

TitlePatterns of added sugars intake by eating occasion among a nationally representative sample of Australians
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
European Journal of Nutrition, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE: To examine the eating occasion (EO) where most added sugars (AS) were consumed using a nationally representative dataset. METHODS: Plausible dietary data from the Australian Health Survey respondents (n = 8202), collected by a multiple-pass 24-h recall, were analyzed. EO was self-reported during the recall. AS content of the foods reported was estimated using a previously published method. Proportion of daily AS consumed (%ASdaily) and the main food sources, at each EO, were calculated. Differences between children/adolescents and adults were tested by one-way ANOVA. Further stratification by age group and sex was performed. RESULTS: The majority of the %ASdaily came from non-main meal occasions (NMMOs; 48.3 %, 95 % CI 47.5-49.0 %), followed by breakfast/brunch (20.6 %, 95 % CI 20.1-21.1 %). Children and adolescents consumed more %ASdaily during NMMOs compared with adults (52 vs. 47 %; p < 0.001), while girls/women consumed more %ASdaily during NMMO compared with boys (54 vs. 49 %; p = 0.002) and men (50 vs. 45 %; p < 0.001). Sugar-sweetened beverages were the top contributors to AS at lunch, dinner and NMMOs, while sugar and sweet spreads were the top contributor at breakfast/brunch. Other top contributors at NMMOs included "other foods," ice cream and cakes and biscuits, pastries and batter-based products. CONCLUSION: Australians consumed nearly half of %ASdaily during NMMOs, most of which came from high-sugar energy-dense nutrient-poor foods. While the common perception that most AS come from snacks holds true, our results suggest that main meals are also important intervention targets.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238793

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLouie, CYJ-
dc.contributor.authorRangan, AM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-20T01:26:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-20T01:26:06Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Nutrition, 2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238793-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To examine the eating occasion (EO) where most added sugars (AS) were consumed using a nationally representative dataset. METHODS: Plausible dietary data from the Australian Health Survey respondents (n = 8202), collected by a multiple-pass 24-h recall, were analyzed. EO was self-reported during the recall. AS content of the foods reported was estimated using a previously published method. Proportion of daily AS consumed (%ASdaily) and the main food sources, at each EO, were calculated. Differences between children/adolescents and adults were tested by one-way ANOVA. Further stratification by age group and sex was performed. RESULTS: The majority of the %ASdaily came from non-main meal occasions (NMMOs; 48.3 %, 95 % CI 47.5-49.0 %), followed by breakfast/brunch (20.6 %, 95 % CI 20.1-21.1 %). Children and adolescents consumed more %ASdaily during NMMOs compared with adults (52 vs. 47 %; p < 0.001), while girls/women consumed more %ASdaily during NMMO compared with boys (54 vs. 49 %; p = 0.002) and men (50 vs. 45 %; p < 0.001). Sugar-sweetened beverages were the top contributors to AS at lunch, dinner and NMMOs, while sugar and sweet spreads were the top contributor at breakfast/brunch. Other top contributors at NMMOs included "other foods," ice cream and cakes and biscuits, pastries and batter-based products. CONCLUSION: Australians consumed nearly half of %ASdaily during NMMOs, most of which came from high-sugar energy-dense nutrient-poor foods. While the common perception that most AS come from snacks holds true, our results suggest that main meals are also important intervention targets.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Nutrition-
dc.titlePatterns of added sugars intake by eating occasion among a nationally representative sample of Australians-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, CYJ: h0115648@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, CYJ=rp02118-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00394-016-1303-0-
dc.identifier.hkuros271461-

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