undergraduate thesis: Acoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal speech of Cantonese

TitleAcoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal speech of Cantonese
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chiu, K. [趙嘉麗]. (2012). Acoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal speech of Cantonese. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThis study investigated the acoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal (TE) speech of Cantonese. Seven TE speakers and seven aged-matched laryngeal (NL) speakers produced sustained vowel phonation and passage reading. Both acoustic and EGG signals were recorded and analyzed using software programs Praat and Voce Vista. Results indicated that there was a significantly lower fundamental frequency (F0) for TE than NL speakers in passage reading. Significantly higher jitter, shimmer and closed quotient (CQ), and lower harmonic-to-noise ratio (H/N) values were associated with TE speech in both sustained vowel phonation and passage reading. Higher formant frequencies in sustained /i/ phonation were found for TE speakers. The findings appear to explain the perceptually hoarse, breathy and low-pitch voice of TE speech. Results were discussed in terms of higher position, greater tissue density, slower movement during closing phase and aperiodic vibration of neoglottis of TE speakers than the vocal folds of NL speakers.
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
SubjectEsophageal speech
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237897
HKU Library Item IDb5805897

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Ka-lai-
dc.contributor.author趙嘉麗-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-26T04:56:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-26T04:56:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationChiu, K. [趙嘉麗]. (2012). Acoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal speech of Cantonese. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237897-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the acoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal (TE) speech of Cantonese. Seven TE speakers and seven aged-matched laryngeal (NL) speakers produced sustained vowel phonation and passage reading. Both acoustic and EGG signals were recorded and analyzed using software programs Praat and Voce Vista. Results indicated that there was a significantly lower fundamental frequency (F0) for TE than NL speakers in passage reading. Significantly higher jitter, shimmer and closed quotient (CQ), and lower harmonic-to-noise ratio (H/N) values were associated with TE speech in both sustained vowel phonation and passage reading. Higher formant frequencies in sustained /i/ phonation were found for TE speakers. The findings appear to explain the perceptually hoarse, breathy and low-pitch voice of TE speech. Results were discussed in terms of higher position, greater tissue density, slower movement during closing phase and aperiodic vibration of neoglottis of TE speakers than the vocal folds of NL speakers.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshEsophageal speech-
dc.titleAcoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) characteristics of tracheoesophageal speech of Cantonese-
dc.typeUG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5805897-
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelBachelor-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciences-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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