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Conference Paper: fMRI may help resolve incompatibility between clinical and conventional MRI findings

TitlefMRI may help resolve incompatibility between clinical and conventional MRI findings
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/gsj
Citation
The 2015 Global Spine Congress, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 20-23 May 2015. In Global Spine Journal, 2015, v. 5 suppl. 1: abstract no. A236 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: When assessing patients with cervical myelopathy, it is not uncommon to find patients with localizing signs that may not be entirely compatible with the 2D images seen on conventional MRI. Dynamic MRI films may add information, but with fMRI, specifically diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), more information regarding the microstructure of the tracts may be gleaned. Thus, this helps ensure that the diagnosis of cervical myelopathy is accurate and that the operation will be over the correct level(s). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective case series in consecutive patients with cervical myelopathy was reviewed. The parameters looked at included multilevel compression, sidedness of compression, and detailed neurological assessment. T2-weighted (T2W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI were used to compare against a reference, the neurological findings. “Level diagnosis” and sidedness compatibility were then assessed. RESULTS: Weighted orientation entropy-based DTI analysis provided a closer match to the “level diagnosis.” Detailed DTI analysis also enabled reconciliation of neurological findings compared with conventional MRI. This was compared using simple anterior–posterior compression and high signal intensity (when available) as a means to identify level and determine clinical compatibility. CONCLUSION: DTI has the potential of becoming a new standard for examining patients with cervical myelopathy, both in identifying diagnostic compatibility and the level most contributory to the neurological deficit. Further studies are required to further establish actual clinical usefulness of this modality.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Global Spine Congress 2015
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/235131
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, KC-
dc.contributor.authorLi, X-
dc.contributor.authorHu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T13:51:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T13:51:26Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2015 Global Spine Congress, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 20-23 May 2015. In Global Spine Journal, 2015, v. 5 suppl. 1: abstract no. A236-
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/235131-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Global Spine Congress 2015-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: When assessing patients with cervical myelopathy, it is not uncommon to find patients with localizing signs that may not be entirely compatible with the 2D images seen on conventional MRI. Dynamic MRI films may add information, but with fMRI, specifically diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), more information regarding the microstructure of the tracts may be gleaned. Thus, this helps ensure that the diagnosis of cervical myelopathy is accurate and that the operation will be over the correct level(s). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective case series in consecutive patients with cervical myelopathy was reviewed. The parameters looked at included multilevel compression, sidedness of compression, and detailed neurological assessment. T2-weighted (T2W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI were used to compare against a reference, the neurological findings. “Level diagnosis” and sidedness compatibility were then assessed. RESULTS: Weighted orientation entropy-based DTI analysis provided a closer match to the “level diagnosis.” Detailed DTI analysis also enabled reconciliation of neurological findings compared with conventional MRI. This was compared using simple anterior–posterior compression and high signal intensity (when available) as a means to identify level and determine clinical compatibility. CONCLUSION: DTI has the potential of becoming a new standard for examining patients with cervical myelopathy, both in identifying diagnostic compatibility and the level most contributory to the neurological deficit. Further studies are required to further establish actual clinical usefulness of this modality.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/gsj-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journal-
dc.rightsGlobal Spine Journal. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.titlefMRI may help resolve incompatibility between clinical and conventional MRI findings-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailMak, KC: kincmak@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y: yhud@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMak, KC=rp01957-
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432-
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0035-1554340-
dc.identifier.hkuros268581-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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