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Book Chapter: Priorities for Health Education in Hong Kong in Relation to Non-Communicable Diseases

TitlePriorities for Health Education in Hong Kong in Relation to Non-Communicable Diseases
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherSense Publishers
Citation
Priorities for Health Education in Hong Kong in Relation to Non-Communicable Diseases. In Taylor, N ... (et al) (Eds.), Health Education In Context: An International Perspective On Health Education In Schools And Local Communities, p. 211-221. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractChronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing rapidly worldwide and therefore have considerable implications for health education. Like other advanced countries, Hong Kong, which is a special administrative region of Mainland China, has experienced an epidemiological transition wherein chronic NCDs have overtaken communicable diseases as the major cause of mortality and morbidity. Registered deaths due to infectious and parasitic diseases decreased from 10.1% in 1964 to 2.8% in 2004, while the mortality rate due to neoplasms and diseases of the circulatory system increased twofold, from 30.9% to 59.5% in the same period of time (Department of Health, 2008a).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/234315
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, EMY-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, MMH-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T07:00:31Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T07:00:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPriorities for Health Education in Hong Kong in Relation to Non-Communicable Diseases. In Taylor, N ... (et al) (Eds.), Health Education In Context: An International Perspective On Health Education In Schools And Local Communities, p. 211-221. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2012-
dc.identifier.isbn9789460918759-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/234315-
dc.description.abstractChronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing rapidly worldwide and therefore have considerable implications for health education. Like other advanced countries, Hong Kong, which is a special administrative region of Mainland China, has experienced an epidemiological transition wherein chronic NCDs have overtaken communicable diseases as the major cause of mortality and morbidity. Registered deaths due to infectious and parasitic diseases decreased from 10.1% in 1964 to 2.8% in 2004, while the mortality rate due to neoplasms and diseases of the circulatory system increased twofold, from 30.9% to 59.5% in the same period of time (Department of Health, 2008a).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSense Publishers-
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Education In Context: An International Perspective On Health Education In Schools And Local Communities-
dc.titlePriorities for Health Education in Hong Kong in Relation to Non-Communicable Diseases-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailWong, EMY: emmy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-6091-876-6_23-
dc.identifier.hkuros263312-
dc.identifier.spage211-
dc.identifier.epage221-
dc.publisher.placeRotterdam-

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