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Article: Mapping Parliamentary Law and Practice in Hong Kong

TitleMapping Parliamentary Law and Practice in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsComparative constitutional law
Legislative Council of Hong Kong
Legislative supremacy
Parliamentary accountability
Parliamentary privilege
Issue Date2015
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cjcl/
Citation
The Chinese Journal of Comparative Law, 2015, v. 3, p. 97-118 How to Cite?
AbstractLegislative supremacy, parliamentary accountability, and parliamentary privilege are the cornerstones of the lex et consuetudo parliamenti (law and custom of Parliament) in the United Kingdom. This article systematically examines, from the standpoint of comparative constitutional law, how a variant of this mainstay of British constitutionalism continues to thrive in the law books and case law of Hong Kong, notwithstanding the resumption of sovereignty by the People’s Republic of China. It shows how parliamentary law in general and the doctrine of legislative supremacy in particular reinforce, rather than defeat, the pre-eminence of the Chief Executive in Council within the legislative process. Incidentally, it reveals that the full potential of Hong Kong’s British-descended lex et consuetudo parliamenti in promoting effective lawmaking remains largely untapped in spite of the persistent gridlocks and tensions between the Legislative Council and the government since 1995.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233884
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, Eric C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-29T03:15:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-29T03:15:44Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe Chinese Journal of Comparative Law, 2015, v. 3, p. 97-118-
dc.identifier.issn2050-4802-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233884-
dc.description.abstractLegislative supremacy, parliamentary accountability, and parliamentary privilege are the cornerstones of the lex et consuetudo parliamenti (law and custom of Parliament) in the United Kingdom. This article systematically examines, from the standpoint of comparative constitutional law, how a variant of this mainstay of British constitutionalism continues to thrive in the law books and case law of Hong Kong, notwithstanding the resumption of sovereignty by the People’s Republic of China. It shows how parliamentary law in general and the doctrine of legislative supremacy in particular reinforce, rather than defeat, the pre-eminence of the Chief Executive in Council within the legislative process. Incidentally, it reveals that the full potential of Hong Kong’s British-descended lex et consuetudo parliamenti in promoting effective lawmaking remains largely untapped in spite of the persistent gridlocks and tensions between the Legislative Council and the government since 1995.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cjcl/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Chinese Journal of Comparative Law-
dc.subjectComparative constitutional law-
dc.subjectLegislative Council of Hong Kong-
dc.subjectLegislative supremacy-
dc.subjectParliamentary accountability-
dc.subjectParliamentary privilege-
dc.titleMapping Parliamentary Law and Practice in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailIp, Eric C.: ericcip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, Eric C.=rp02161-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cjcl/cxu005-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.spage97-
dc.identifier.epage118-

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