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Article: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Source Credibility Theory Applied to Logo and Website Design for Heightened Credibility and Consumer Trust

TitleA Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Source Credibility Theory Applied to Logo and Website Design for Heightened Credibility and Consumer Trust
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 2014, v. 30, n. 1, p. 63-93 How to Cite?
AbstractWebsites are often the first or only interaction a consumer has with a firm in modern commerce. Because consumers tend to make decisions within the first few seconds of online interaction, the first impression given to users can greatly determine a website's success. Leveraging source credibility theory, a strategy is presented for building credibility derived from a user's initial impressions of a website, in online environments. The study demonstrates that logos designed to communicate traits of credibility (i.e., expertise and trustworthiness) can trigger positive credibility judgments about the firm's website and that this increase in perceived credibility results in greater trust and willingness to transact with the firm. In addition, the study demonstrates distinct effects on consumers' distrusting beliefs. The positive trust effects are magnified when the design of a website extends and complements the credibility-based logo design. This practice-supporting model further indicates how website designers can methodically design logos and websites that nonverbally communicate credibility information within the first few moments of a website interaction. [Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction to view the free supplemental file: Online Appendix A.]. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233832
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.26
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.859

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Paul Benjamin-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, David W.-
dc.contributor.authorHaig, William L.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T07:21:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T07:21:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 2014, v. 30, n. 1, p. 63-93-
dc.identifier.issn1044-7318-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233832-
dc.description.abstractWebsites are often the first or only interaction a consumer has with a firm in modern commerce. Because consumers tend to make decisions within the first few seconds of online interaction, the first impression given to users can greatly determine a website's success. Leveraging source credibility theory, a strategy is presented for building credibility derived from a user's initial impressions of a website, in online environments. The study demonstrates that logos designed to communicate traits of credibility (i.e., expertise and trustworthiness) can trigger positive credibility judgments about the firm's website and that this increase in perceived credibility results in greater trust and willingness to transact with the firm. In addition, the study demonstrates distinct effects on consumers' distrusting beliefs. The positive trust effects are magnified when the design of a website extends and complements the credibility-based logo design. This practice-supporting model further indicates how website designers can methodically design logos and websites that nonverbally communicate credibility information within the first few moments of a website interaction. [Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction to view the free supplemental file: Online Appendix A.]. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Human-Computer Interaction-
dc.titleA Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Source Credibility Theory Applied to Logo and Website Design for Heightened Credibility and Consumer Trust-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10447318.2013.839899-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84889561169-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage63-
dc.identifier.epage93-
dc.identifier.eissn1532-7590-

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