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Book: Questioning Southeast Asia: Epistemology, Networks and Power

TitleQuestioning Southeast Asia: Epistemology, Networks and Power
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherNUS Press
Citation
Seng, MFE. Questioning Southeast Asia: Epistemology, Networks and Power. Singapore: NUS Press.  How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines the embedded contradictions in the building of the People’s Park Complex in Singapore and how it became the state’s primer for urban renewal. The building of the People’s Park Complex embodies the intersecting narratives that comprise descriptions of “Chinese” as defined by regional dialect groups and business associations, and the national designation of the term as an overarching, generalized racial definition. More significantly, it is instrumental in the formulation of a Chinese middle-class whose collective identity was perpetually and publicly reinforced by its proponents: the state, the developer, the entrepreneur and the architect. To what extent did the People’s Park Complex usher the self-conscious re-centering of the city’s identity, as differentiated from the colonial imagination of the Chinese people and their place in the city? How was the paradox of a model for social integration within a development schema played out in the building? This paper addresses these questions by examining the events, objects and ideas to which each of these groups projected and lay claim to the success of the People’s Park Complex as a viable commercial centre and urban public space. It attends to how the building was complicit in the national project of conditioning the people and producing public opinion. Designed for a projected middle-class Chinese public – then still an emergent urban politic of diaspora identities – the building inscribed Singapore as an exemplary modern city in Southeast Asia within the first decade of its completion.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233329

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSeng, MFE-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:36:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:36:07Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationSeng, MFE. Questioning Southeast Asia: Epistemology, Networks and Power. Singapore: NUS Press. -
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/233329-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the embedded contradictions in the building of the People’s Park Complex in Singapore and how it became the state’s primer for urban renewal. The building of the People’s Park Complex embodies the intersecting narratives that comprise descriptions of “Chinese” as defined by regional dialect groups and business associations, and the national designation of the term as an overarching, generalized racial definition. More significantly, it is instrumental in the formulation of a Chinese middle-class whose collective identity was perpetually and publicly reinforced by its proponents: the state, the developer, the entrepreneur and the architect. To what extent did the People’s Park Complex usher the self-conscious re-centering of the city’s identity, as differentiated from the colonial imagination of the Chinese people and their place in the city? How was the paradox of a model for social integration within a development schema played out in the building? This paper addresses these questions by examining the events, objects and ideas to which each of these groups projected and lay claim to the success of the People’s Park Complex as a viable commercial centre and urban public space. It attends to how the building was complicit in the national project of conditioning the people and producing public opinion. Designed for a projected middle-class Chinese public – then still an emergent urban politic of diaspora identities – the building inscribed Singapore as an exemplary modern city in Southeast Asia within the first decade of its completion.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNUS Press-
dc.titleQuestioning Southeast Asia: Epistemology, Networks and Power-
dc.typeBook-
dc.identifier.emailSeng, MFE: eseng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySeng, MFE=rp01022-
dc.identifier.hkuros264904-
dc.publisher.placeSingapore-

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