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Article: Democracy without Autonomy: Moral & Personal Autonomy in Democratic Confucianism

TitleDemocracy without Autonomy: Moral & Personal Autonomy in Democratic Confucianism
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherUniversity of Hawaii Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/pew/index.html
Citation
Philosophy East and West, 2017, v. 67 n. 1 (Forthcoming) How to Cite?
AbstractGiven contemporary international ethical and political norms, a viable democratic Confucianism must contend with the importance of autonomy. Joseph Chan’s modern reconstruction of Confucianism, in Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times, is one of the leading conceptions of neo-Confucianism, and claims to accept some forms of moral autonomy, while finding that personal autonomy not necessary for the Confucian democratic project. I argue that his modern Confucian perfectionism in fact does the opposite: it lacks genuine moral autonomy while relying on the exercise of personal autonomy. The respective absence and presence of moral and personal autonomy raises doubts about how Confucianism and democracy can be reconciled, if at all.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231238
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.173

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:21:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:21:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationPhilosophy East and West, 2017, v. 67 n. 1 (Forthcoming)-
dc.identifier.issn0031-8221-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231238-
dc.description.abstractGiven contemporary international ethical and political norms, a viable democratic Confucianism must contend with the importance of autonomy. Joseph Chan’s modern reconstruction of Confucianism, in Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times, is one of the leading conceptions of neo-Confucianism, and claims to accept some forms of moral autonomy, while finding that personal autonomy not necessary for the Confucian democratic project. I argue that his modern Confucian perfectionism in fact does the opposite: it lacks genuine moral autonomy while relying on the exercise of personal autonomy. The respective absence and presence of moral and personal autonomy raises doubts about how Confucianism and democracy can be reconciled, if at all.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherUniversity of Hawaii Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/pew/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofPhilosophy East and West-
dc.rightsPhilosophy East and West. Copyright © University of Hawaii Press.-
dc.titleDemocracy without Autonomy: Moral & Personal Autonomy in Democratic Confucianism-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, Y: yvchiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, Y=rp01417-
dc.identifier.hkuros264393-
dc.identifier.volume67-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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