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postgraduate thesis: Too big to fail, too big to succeed or too complex to succeed? : evidence for U.S. bank holding companies

TitleToo big to fail, too big to succeed or too complex to succeed? : evidence for U.S. bank holding companies
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Wang, S. [王世璇]. (2015). Too big to fail, too big to succeed or too complex to succeed? : evidence for U.S. bank holding companies. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5576760
AbstractThis study examines the joint and separate effects of scale and scope economies on the performance of U.S. bank holding companies (BHCs) as measured by return on assets (ROA) and utilizing a database obtained from the U.S. Federal Reserve under the Freedom of Information Act provisions. Consistent with recently expressed concerns regarding the operating performance of “too big to fall” banks, this study finds little support for economies of scale for U.S. BHCs and supportive evidence of diseconomies of scope in organizational complexity measured by subsidiaries. In particular, negative relations between organizational complexity and BHC performance is found to be more pronounced for the largest and most complex BHCs. In addition, associations between the organizational complexity and BHC performance are further found to vary by subsidiary type. Specifically, BHCs with both U.S. domestic and foreign subsidiaries exhibit economies of scope in operating domestic subsidiaries and diseconomies of scope in operating inherently more complex foreign subsidiaries. By contrast, BHCs with only U.S. domestic subsidiaries exhibit diseconomies of scope in organizational complexity in these domestic subsidiaries. As such, this study documents key distinctions that extend literatures on banking scale and scope economies relevant to policy makers, regulators, researchers, managements, and other stakeholders regarding the effects of size and organizational complexity on the operating performance of U.S. bank holding companies.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectBank holding companies - United States
Dept/ProgramBusiness
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231107

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Shixuan-
dc.contributor.author王世璇-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-09T23:12:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-09T23:12:56Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationWang, S. [王世璇]. (2015). Too big to fail, too big to succeed or too complex to succeed? : evidence for U.S. bank holding companies. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5576760-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231107-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the joint and separate effects of scale and scope economies on the performance of U.S. bank holding companies (BHCs) as measured by return on assets (ROA) and utilizing a database obtained from the U.S. Federal Reserve under the Freedom of Information Act provisions. Consistent with recently expressed concerns regarding the operating performance of “too big to fall” banks, this study finds little support for economies of scale for U.S. BHCs and supportive evidence of diseconomies of scope in organizational complexity measured by subsidiaries. In particular, negative relations between organizational complexity and BHC performance is found to be more pronounced for the largest and most complex BHCs. In addition, associations between the organizational complexity and BHC performance are further found to vary by subsidiary type. Specifically, BHCs with both U.S. domestic and foreign subsidiaries exhibit economies of scope in operating domestic subsidiaries and diseconomies of scope in operating inherently more complex foreign subsidiaries. By contrast, BHCs with only U.S. domestic subsidiaries exhibit diseconomies of scope in organizational complexity in these domestic subsidiaries. As such, this study documents key distinctions that extend literatures on banking scale and scope economies relevant to policy makers, regulators, researchers, managements, and other stakeholders regarding the effects of size and organizational complexity on the operating performance of U.S. bank holding companies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshBank holding companies - United States-
dc.titleToo big to fail, too big to succeed or too complex to succeed? : evidence for U.S. bank holding companies-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5576760-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineBusiness-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5576760-

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