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Article: Pathways to arithmetic: The role of visual-spatial and language skills in written arithmetic, arithmetic word problems, and nonsymbolic arithmetic

TitlePathways to arithmetic: The role of visual-spatial and language skills in written arithmetic, arithmetic word problems, and nonsymbolic arithmetic
Authors
KeywordsMorphological skills
Arithmetic
Mathematics
Phonological skills
Visual-orthographic skills
Visual-spatial skills
Issue Date2015
Citation
Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2015, v. 41, p. 188-197 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Elsevier Inc.This study set out to develop and test a pathway model of the relations between general cognitive skills, specifically visual-spatial and spoken and written language skills, and competence in three forms of arithmetic that vary in modes of number representation. A total of 88 Chinese 4-year-olds participated and were tested first in kindergarten second grade (K2) and then in kindergarten third grade (K3). Language skills, including phonological, morphological, and visual-orthographic skills, and visual-spatial skills were measured at K2, and arithmetic outcomes, including written arithmetic, word problems, and nonsymbolic arithmetic, at K3. The results generally supported our model. Specifically, visual-spatial skills contributed to the prediction of all three types of arithmetic outcomes. Morphological skills predicted word problems, whereas phonological skills predicted written arithmetic. Finally, visual-orthographic skills contributed to both written and nonsymbolic arithmetic. These findings underscore the importance of delineating the specificity of cognitive processes in learning diverse forms of arithmetic.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230977
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.492
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.426

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xiao-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Dan-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationContemporary Educational Psychology, 2015, v. 41, p. 188-197-
dc.identifier.issn0361-476X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230977-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Elsevier Inc.This study set out to develop and test a pathway model of the relations between general cognitive skills, specifically visual-spatial and spoken and written language skills, and competence in three forms of arithmetic that vary in modes of number representation. A total of 88 Chinese 4-year-olds participated and were tested first in kindergarten second grade (K2) and then in kindergarten third grade (K3). Language skills, including phonological, morphological, and visual-orthographic skills, and visual-spatial skills were measured at K2, and arithmetic outcomes, including written arithmetic, word problems, and nonsymbolic arithmetic, at K3. The results generally supported our model. Specifically, visual-spatial skills contributed to the prediction of all three types of arithmetic outcomes. Morphological skills predicted word problems, whereas phonological skills predicted written arithmetic. Finally, visual-orthographic skills contributed to both written and nonsymbolic arithmetic. These findings underscore the importance of delineating the specificity of cognitive processes in learning diverse forms of arithmetic.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofContemporary Educational Psychology-
dc.subjectMorphological skills-
dc.subjectArithmetic-
dc.subjectMathematics-
dc.subjectPhonological skills-
dc.subjectVisual-orthographic skills-
dc.subjectVisual-spatial skills-
dc.titlePathways to arithmetic: The role of visual-spatial and language skills in written arithmetic, arithmetic word problems, and nonsymbolic arithmetic-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cedpsych.2015.01.005-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84923131911-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.spage188-
dc.identifier.epage197-
dc.identifier.eissn1090-2384-

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