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Article: Detecting concealed information using feedback related event-related brain potentials

TitleDetecting concealed information using feedback related event-related brain potentials
Authors
KeywordsEvent-related potentials
Conceal information test
Deception detection
Feedback processing
Issue Date2014
Citation
Brain and Cognition, 2014, v. 90, p. 142-150 How to Cite?
AbstractEmploying an event-related potential (ERP)-based concealed information test (CIT), the present study investigated (1) the neurocognitive processes when people received feedbacks regarding their deceptive/truthful responses and (2) whether such feedback-related ERP activities can be used to detect concealed information above and beyond the recognition-related P300. During the CIT, participants were presented with rare, meaningful probes (their own names) embedded within a series of frequent yet meaningless irrelevants (others' names). Participants were instructed to deny their recognition of the probes. Critically, following participants' responses, they were provided with feedbacks regarding whether they succeeded or failed in the CIT. Replicating previous ERP-based CITs, we found a larger P300 elicited by probe compared to irrelevant. Regarding feedback-related ERPs, a temporospatial Principle Component Analyses found two ERP components that were not only sensitive to feedback manipulations but also can discriminate probe from irrelevant: an earlier, central-distributed positivity that was elicited by "success" feedbacks peaked around 219. ms; and a later, right central-distributed positivity that was also elicited by "success" feedbacks, peaked around 400. ms. Importantly, the feedback ERPs were not correlated with P300 that was elicited by probe/irrelevant, suggesting that these two ERPs reflect independent processes underlying memory concealment. These findings illustrate the feasibility and promise of using feedback-related ERPs to detect concealed memory and thus deception. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230967
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.399
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.511

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSai, Liyang-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Xiaohong-
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorFu, Genyue-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBrain and Cognition, 2014, v. 90, p. 142-150-
dc.identifier.issn0278-2626-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230967-
dc.description.abstractEmploying an event-related potential (ERP)-based concealed information test (CIT), the present study investigated (1) the neurocognitive processes when people received feedbacks regarding their deceptive/truthful responses and (2) whether such feedback-related ERP activities can be used to detect concealed information above and beyond the recognition-related P300. During the CIT, participants were presented with rare, meaningful probes (their own names) embedded within a series of frequent yet meaningless irrelevants (others' names). Participants were instructed to deny their recognition of the probes. Critically, following participants' responses, they were provided with feedbacks regarding whether they succeeded or failed in the CIT. Replicating previous ERP-based CITs, we found a larger P300 elicited by probe compared to irrelevant. Regarding feedback-related ERPs, a temporospatial Principle Component Analyses found two ERP components that were not only sensitive to feedback manipulations but also can discriminate probe from irrelevant: an earlier, central-distributed positivity that was elicited by "success" feedbacks peaked around 219. ms; and a later, right central-distributed positivity that was also elicited by "success" feedbacks, peaked around 400. ms. Importantly, the feedback ERPs were not correlated with P300 that was elicited by probe/irrelevant, suggesting that these two ERPs reflect independent processes underlying memory concealment. These findings illustrate the feasibility and promise of using feedback-related ERPs to detect concealed memory and thus deception. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Cognition-
dc.subjectEvent-related potentials-
dc.subjectConceal information test-
dc.subjectDeception detection-
dc.subjectFeedback processing-
dc.titleDetecting concealed information using feedback related event-related brain potentials-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandc.2014.06.012-
dc.identifier.pmid25058495-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84904766505-
dc.identifier.volume90-
dc.identifier.spage142-
dc.identifier.epage150-
dc.identifier.eissn1090-2147-

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