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Article: N200 and P300 as orthogonal and integrable indicators of distinct awareness and recognition processes in memory detection

TitleN200 and P300 as orthogonal and integrable indicators of distinct awareness and recognition processes in memory detection
Authors
KeywordsP300
Event-related brain potentials
Ego depletion
Concealed information test
Complex trial protocol
Stroop task
Response monitoring
N200
Memory detection
Issue Date2013
Citation
Psychophysiology, 2013, v. 50, n. 5, p. 454-464 How to Cite?
AbstractIn an event-related potential (ERP)-based concealed information test (CIT), we investigated the effect of manipulated awareness of concealed information on the ERPs. Participants either committed a mock crime or not (guilty vs. innocent) before the CIT, and received feedback regarding either specific (high awareness) or general (low awareness) task performance during the CIT. We found that awareness and recognition of the crime-relevant information differentially influenced the frontal-central N200 and parietal P300: Probe elicited a larger N200 than irrelevant only when guilty participants were in the high awareness condition, whereas the P300 was mainly responsive to information recognition. No N200-P300 correlation was found, allowing for a combined measure of both yielding the highest detection efficiency in the high awareness group (AUC=91). Finally, a color-naming Stroop task following the CIT revealed that guilty participants showed larger interference effects than innocent participants, suggesting that the former expended more attentional resources during the CIT. © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230924
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.074
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.850

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorPornpattananangkul, Narun-
dc.contributor.authorRosenfeld, J. Peter-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPsychophysiology, 2013, v. 50, n. 5, p. 454-464-
dc.identifier.issn0048-5772-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230924-
dc.description.abstractIn an event-related potential (ERP)-based concealed information test (CIT), we investigated the effect of manipulated awareness of concealed information on the ERPs. Participants either committed a mock crime or not (guilty vs. innocent) before the CIT, and received feedback regarding either specific (high awareness) or general (low awareness) task performance during the CIT. We found that awareness and recognition of the crime-relevant information differentially influenced the frontal-central N200 and parietal P300: Probe elicited a larger N200 than irrelevant only when guilty participants were in the high awareness condition, whereas the P300 was mainly responsive to information recognition. No N200-P300 correlation was found, allowing for a combined measure of both yielding the highest detection efficiency in the high awareness group (AUC=91). Finally, a color-naming Stroop task following the CIT revealed that guilty participants showed larger interference effects than innocent participants, suggesting that the former expended more attentional resources during the CIT. © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychophysiology-
dc.subjectP300-
dc.subjectEvent-related brain potentials-
dc.subjectEgo depletion-
dc.subjectConcealed information test-
dc.subjectComplex trial protocol-
dc.subjectStroop task-
dc.subjectResponse monitoring-
dc.subjectN200-
dc.subjectMemory detection-
dc.titleN200 and P300 as orthogonal and integrable indicators of distinct awareness and recognition processes in memory detection-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/psyp.12018-
dc.identifier.pmid23317115-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875637483-
dc.identifier.volume50-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage454-
dc.identifier.epage464-
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8986-

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