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Article: The Effects of Parental Education and Family Income on Mother-Child Relationships, Father-Child Relationships, and Family Environments in the People's Republic of China

TitleThe Effects of Parental Education and Family Income on Mother-Child Relationships, Father-Child Relationships, and Family Environments in the People's Republic of China
Authors
KeywordsParental Education
Father-Child Relationships
Family Stress
Family Investment
Family Income
Issue Date2012
Citation
Family Process, 2012, v. 51, n. 4, p. 483-497 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing a cross-sectional design with 407 Chinese children aged 3-5 years and their parents, this study examined the effects of socioeconomic status, specifically parents' education and family income, on the children's mother-child relationships, father-child relationships, and the social environment in their families. The results indicated that income negatively predicted conflict in father-child relationships and positively predicted family active-recreational environments. Income also positively predicted family cohesion among girls but not boys. Maternal education negatively predicted conflict in mother-child relationships and positively predicted closeness in mother-child and father-child relationships, family cohesion, and the intellectual-cultural and active-recreational environments in the family. Paternal education positively predicted family cohesion and intellectual-cultural and active-recreational environments. Income was found to partially mediate the effects of both maternal and paternal education on family active-recreational environments. Findings are discussed in the frameworks of the family stress model and the family investment model. © FPI, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230913
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.065

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xiao-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationFamily Process, 2012, v. 51, n. 4, p. 483-497-
dc.identifier.issn0014-7370-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230913-
dc.description.abstractUsing a cross-sectional design with 407 Chinese children aged 3-5 years and their parents, this study examined the effects of socioeconomic status, specifically parents' education and family income, on the children's mother-child relationships, father-child relationships, and the social environment in their families. The results indicated that income negatively predicted conflict in father-child relationships and positively predicted family active-recreational environments. Income also positively predicted family cohesion among girls but not boys. Maternal education negatively predicted conflict in mother-child relationships and positively predicted closeness in mother-child and father-child relationships, family cohesion, and the intellectual-cultural and active-recreational environments in the family. Paternal education positively predicted family cohesion and intellectual-cultural and active-recreational environments. Income was found to partially mediate the effects of both maternal and paternal education on family active-recreational environments. Findings are discussed in the frameworks of the family stress model and the family investment model. © FPI, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Process-
dc.subjectParental Education-
dc.subjectFather-Child Relationships-
dc.subjectFamily Stress-
dc.subjectFamily Investment-
dc.subjectFamily Income-
dc.titleThe Effects of Parental Education and Family Income on Mother-Child Relationships, Father-Child Relationships, and Family Environments in the People's Republic of China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1545-5300.2011.01380.x-
dc.identifier.pmid23230980-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84870919598-
dc.identifier.volume51-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage483-
dc.identifier.epage497-
dc.identifier.eissn1545-5300-

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