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Article: Combating Automatic Autobiographical Associations: The Effect of Instruction and Training in Strategically Concealing Information in the Autobiographical Implicit Association Test

TitleCombating Automatic Autobiographical Associations: The Effect of Instruction and Training in Strategically Concealing Information in the Autobiographical Implicit Association Test
Authors
Keywordsautobiographical memory
automatic processes
Implicit Association Test
self-regulation
training
Issue Date2012
Citation
Psychological Science, 2012, v. 23, n. 10, p. 1079-1085 How to Cite?
AbstractOne of the most heavily debated questions in implicit social cognition is the extent to which implicit measures can be voluntarily controlled. The experiment reported here is the first to employ a novel strategy for intentionally controlling performance in the autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT). Specifically, when explicitly instructed to do so, participants were able to speed up their responses in the incongruent blocks of the aIAT and thus influence the outcome of the test. This effect was larger when the experimental instruction was followed by practice in speeding responses than when the instruction was given alone. A process-dissociation analysis suggested that the effect was due to reductions in the ability of participants' automatic associations to influence responses when instructions to speed up were provided. This experiment provides new insight into the potential for strategic control in the performance of implicit measures and into the interplay between automatic and controlled processes underlying performance on implicit measures. © The Author(s) 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230903
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.476
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.375

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorRosenfeld, J. Peter-
dc.contributor.authorBodenhausen, Galen V.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Science, 2012, v. 23, n. 10, p. 1079-1085-
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230903-
dc.description.abstractOne of the most heavily debated questions in implicit social cognition is the extent to which implicit measures can be voluntarily controlled. The experiment reported here is the first to employ a novel strategy for intentionally controlling performance in the autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT). Specifically, when explicitly instructed to do so, participants were able to speed up their responses in the incongruent blocks of the aIAT and thus influence the outcome of the test. This effect was larger when the experimental instruction was followed by practice in speeding responses than when the instruction was given alone. A process-dissociation analysis suggested that the effect was due to reductions in the ability of participants' automatic associations to influence responses when instructions to speed up were provided. This experiment provides new insight into the potential for strategic control in the performance of implicit measures and into the interplay between automatic and controlled processes underlying performance on implicit measures. © The Author(s) 2012.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Science-
dc.subjectautobiographical memory-
dc.subjectautomatic processes-
dc.subjectImplicit Association Test-
dc.subjectself-regulation-
dc.subjecttraining-
dc.titleCombating Automatic Autobiographical Associations: The Effect of Instruction and Training in Strategically Concealing Information in the Autobiographical Implicit Association Test-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0956797612443834-
dc.identifier.pmid22894937-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867660523-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1079-
dc.identifier.epage1085-
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9280-

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