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Article: Temporal course of executive control when lying about self- and other-referential information: An ERP study

TitleTemporal course of executive control when lying about self- and other-referential information: An ERP study
Authors
KeywordsExecutive function
Self-referential information
Self/other
Deception
ERP
Issue Date2011
Citation
Brain Research, 2011, v. 1369, p. 149-157 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent neuroimaging studies have been trying to investigate the neural correlates of deception. To explore the temporal course of neural activity underlying deception, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants were performing the Differentiation of Deception Paradigm (DDP) task to self- and other-referential information. Results showed that lying was associated with increased N1 (parietal-occipital area), N2 (frontal-central area) and decreased P3 (frontal-central area). Moreover, self-referential information elicited larger P2 and P3 compared with other-referential information. Finally, the interaction between stimulus and response types on N2 and P3 suggested that lying about self-referential information is more difficult than lying about other-referential information. These results revealed a temporal course of neural activity regarding executive function underlying deception, which complemented the current understanding of deception from the spatial dimensions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230863
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.561
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.351

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Haiyan-
dc.contributor.authorFu, Genyue-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 2011, v. 1369, p. 149-157-
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230863-
dc.description.abstractRecent neuroimaging studies have been trying to investigate the neural correlates of deception. To explore the temporal course of neural activity underlying deception, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants were performing the Differentiation of Deception Paradigm (DDP) task to self- and other-referential information. Results showed that lying was associated with increased N1 (parietal-occipital area), N2 (frontal-central area) and decreased P3 (frontal-central area). Moreover, self-referential information elicited larger P2 and P3 compared with other-referential information. Finally, the interaction between stimulus and response types on N2 and P3 suggested that lying about self-referential information is more difficult than lying about other-referential information. These results revealed a temporal course of neural activity regarding executive function underlying deception, which complemented the current understanding of deception from the spatial dimensions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Research-
dc.subjectExecutive function-
dc.subjectSelf-referential information-
dc.subjectSelf/other-
dc.subjectDeception-
dc.subjectERP-
dc.titleTemporal course of executive control when lying about self- and other-referential information: An ERP study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brainres.2010.10.106-
dc.identifier.pmid21059343-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651102818-
dc.identifier.volume1369-
dc.identifier.spage149-
dc.identifier.epage157-

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