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Article: Female Cape sugarbirds (Promerops cafer) modify egg investment both for extra-pair mates and for male tail length

TitleFemale Cape sugarbirds (Promerops cafer) modify egg investment both for extra-pair mates and for male tail length
Authors
KeywordsTail manipulation
Promerops cafer
Sexual selection
Differential allocation
Paternity
Issue Date2010
Citation
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 2010, v. 23, n. 9, p. 1998-2003 How to Cite?
AbstractThe differential allocation hypothesis predicts that females should invest more in reproduction when paired with attractive males. We measured egg volume in Cape sugarbirds (Promerops cafer), a sexually dimorphic passerine, in relation to paternity of the offspring and in response to an experimental tail length treatment. We manipulated tail length, after pair formation, but before egg laying: males had their tails either shortened or left unmanipulated. Our manipulation was designed to affect female allocation in a particular breeding attempt rather than long-term mate choice: males with shortened tails would appear to be signalling at a lower level than they should given their quality. We found that egg volume was smaller in the nests of males with experimentally shortened tails but larger when the offspring were the result of extra-pair matings. Both these findings are consistent with the differential allocation hypothesis. We suggest that tail length may be used by females as a cue for mate quality, eliciting reduced female investment when breeding with social mates; and with males with shortened tails. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230856
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.747
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.009

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcfarlane, M. L.-
dc.contributor.authorCherry, M. I.-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, M. R.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:58Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Evolutionary Biology, 2010, v. 23, n. 9, p. 1998-2003-
dc.identifier.issn1010-061X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230856-
dc.description.abstractThe differential allocation hypothesis predicts that females should invest more in reproduction when paired with attractive males. We measured egg volume in Cape sugarbirds (Promerops cafer), a sexually dimorphic passerine, in relation to paternity of the offspring and in response to an experimental tail length treatment. We manipulated tail length, after pair formation, but before egg laying: males had their tails either shortened or left unmanipulated. Our manipulation was designed to affect female allocation in a particular breeding attempt rather than long-term mate choice: males with shortened tails would appear to be signalling at a lower level than they should given their quality. We found that egg volume was smaller in the nests of males with experimentally shortened tails but larger when the offspring were the result of extra-pair matings. Both these findings are consistent with the differential allocation hypothesis. We suggest that tail length may be used by females as a cue for mate quality, eliciting reduced female investment when breeding with social mates; and with males with shortened tails. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Evolutionary Biology-
dc.subjectTail manipulation-
dc.subjectPromerops cafer-
dc.subjectSexual selection-
dc.subjectDifferential allocation-
dc.subjectPaternity-
dc.titleFemale Cape sugarbirds (Promerops cafer) modify egg investment both for extra-pair mates and for male tail length-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02067.x-
dc.identifier.pmid20695964-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955932006-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage1998-
dc.identifier.epage2003-
dc.identifier.eissn1420-9101-

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