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Article: Severe periodontitis is associated with systemic inflammation and a dysmetabolic status: A case-control study

TitleSevere periodontitis is associated with systemic inflammation and a dysmetabolic status: A case-control study
Authors
KeywordsMetabolic syndrome
Insulin resistance
Dyslipidemia
Cardiovascular disease
Systemic inflammation
Periodontitis
Issue Date2007
Citation
Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 2007, v. 34, n. 11, p. 931-937 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Aim: A cluster of metabolic factors defines a syndrome that predisposes to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Chronic infections such as periodontitis might alter these individual metabolic factors and the systemic inflammatory burden. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between severe periodontitis and increase in inflammatory and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods: We examined 302 patients with severe periodontitis and 183 healthy controls, and we collected a blood sample from each subject in order to investigate differences in inflammatory (leukocyte numbers and differential counts) and metabolic markers (lipids and glucose). Results: After correcting for differences in age, gender, smoking and ethnicity, periodontitis subjects exhibited a low-grade systemic inflammation (increased white cell counts, 1.10±1.02 × 10 9/l, 95%CI 1.05-1.15, p=0.0001), dyslipidemia [lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 1.14±1.03 mmol/l, 95%CI 1.08-1.20, p<0.0001 and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 1.12±1.03, 95%CI 1.05-1.19, p<0.0001) and increased non-fasting serum glucose levels (1.04±1.01 mmol/l, 95%CI 1.02-1.06, p=0.01) when compared with controls. The associations were confirmed in a subpopulation of Caucasian non-smokers. A trend for a dose dependent effect of the number of periodontal pockets on the tested inflammatory and metabolic markers was observed. Conclusions: These data suggest a possible link between severe generalized periodontitis, systemic inflammation and a dysmetabolic state in otherwise healthy individuals. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230795
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNibali, Luigi-
dc.contributor.authorD'Aiuto, Francesco-
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Gareth-
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Kalpesh-
dc.contributor.authorSuvan, Jean-
dc.contributor.authorTonetti, Maurizio S.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:49Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:49Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Periodontology, 2007, v. 34, n. 11, p. 931-937-
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230795-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aim: A cluster of metabolic factors defines a syndrome that predisposes to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Chronic infections such as periodontitis might alter these individual metabolic factors and the systemic inflammatory burden. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between severe periodontitis and increase in inflammatory and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods: We examined 302 patients with severe periodontitis and 183 healthy controls, and we collected a blood sample from each subject in order to investigate differences in inflammatory (leukocyte numbers and differential counts) and metabolic markers (lipids and glucose). Results: After correcting for differences in age, gender, smoking and ethnicity, periodontitis subjects exhibited a low-grade systemic inflammation (increased white cell counts, 1.10±1.02 × 10 9/l, 95%CI 1.05-1.15, p=0.0001), dyslipidemia [lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 1.14±1.03 mmol/l, 95%CI 1.08-1.20, p<0.0001 and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 1.12±1.03, 95%CI 1.05-1.19, p<0.0001) and increased non-fasting serum glucose levels (1.04±1.01 mmol/l, 95%CI 1.02-1.06, p=0.01) when compared with controls. The associations were confirmed in a subpopulation of Caucasian non-smokers. A trend for a dose dependent effect of the number of periodontal pockets on the tested inflammatory and metabolic markers was observed. Conclusions: These data suggest a possible link between severe generalized periodontitis, systemic inflammation and a dysmetabolic state in otherwise healthy individuals. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontology-
dc.subjectMetabolic syndrome-
dc.subjectInsulin resistance-
dc.subjectDyslipidemia-
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease-
dc.subjectSystemic inflammation-
dc.subjectPeriodontitis-
dc.titleSevere periodontitis is associated with systemic inflammation and a dysmetabolic status: A case-control study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-051X.2007.01133.x-
dc.identifier.pmid17877746-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35348923484-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage931-
dc.identifier.epage937-
dc.identifier.eissn1600-051X-

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