File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Survival of male scarlet-tufted malachite sunbirds (Nectarinia johnstoni) on Mount Kenya and the influence of ornamentation

TitleSurvival of male scarlet-tufted malachite sunbirds (Nectarinia johnstoni) on Mount Kenya and the influence of ornamentation
Authors
KeywordsSurvival
Tropical birds
Phenotypic variation
Sexual selection
Mate choice
Ornaments
Issue Date2003
Citation
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2003, v. 80, n. 1, p. 125-133 How to Cite?
AbstractA prediction of handicap and signalling theories is that there should be a positive relationship between ornament size and viability. This prediction was tested in scarlet-tufted malachite sunbirds (Nectarinia johnstoni). These birds are endemic to the high-altitude zones of East African mountains. They are bright iridescent green with elongated central tail feathers and red pectoral tufts. The elongated tail is believed to be a mate choice cue, and the red tufts play a role in aggressive encounters between males. As adults, they feed almost exclusively on the nectar of Lobelia telekii flowers, which males defend from conspecifics. The long term survival of individually identifiable males colour-marked in 1989 and 1990 was investigated. Territorial adult males had an average annual survival rate of 72%, which is at the top of the range reported for tropical birds. The effects of morphology and territory characteristics on male survival were examined by adding covariates to the survival model. This analysis showed that male N. johnstoni with longer tails had a higher probability of survival than did short-tailed males. There was no apparent relation between tuft size or the number of L. telekii inflorescences on the territory and survival. The results presented here suggest that long-tailed males may be of intrinsically higher quality than are shorter tailed males. If this is true then females may benefit by using this trait as a mate choice cue through increased viability of their offspring. © 2003 The Linnean Society of London.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230723
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.984
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.172

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Matthew R.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:39Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationBiological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2003, v. 80, n. 1, p. 125-133-
dc.identifier.issn0024-4066-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230723-
dc.description.abstractA prediction of handicap and signalling theories is that there should be a positive relationship between ornament size and viability. This prediction was tested in scarlet-tufted malachite sunbirds (Nectarinia johnstoni). These birds are endemic to the high-altitude zones of East African mountains. They are bright iridescent green with elongated central tail feathers and red pectoral tufts. The elongated tail is believed to be a mate choice cue, and the red tufts play a role in aggressive encounters between males. As adults, they feed almost exclusively on the nectar of Lobelia telekii flowers, which males defend from conspecifics. The long term survival of individually identifiable males colour-marked in 1989 and 1990 was investigated. Territorial adult males had an average annual survival rate of 72%, which is at the top of the range reported for tropical birds. The effects of morphology and territory characteristics on male survival were examined by adding covariates to the survival model. This analysis showed that male N. johnstoni with longer tails had a higher probability of survival than did short-tailed males. There was no apparent relation between tuft size or the number of L. telekii inflorescences on the territory and survival. The results presented here suggest that long-tailed males may be of intrinsically higher quality than are shorter tailed males. If this is true then females may benefit by using this trait as a mate choice cue through increased viability of their offspring. © 2003 The Linnean Society of London.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Journal of the Linnean Society-
dc.subjectSurvival-
dc.subjectTropical birds-
dc.subjectPhenotypic variation-
dc.subjectSexual selection-
dc.subjectMate choice-
dc.subjectOrnaments-
dc.titleSurvival of male scarlet-tufted malachite sunbirds (Nectarinia johnstoni) on Mount Kenya and the influence of ornamentation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1095-8312.2003.00224.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0141459196-
dc.identifier.volume80-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage125-
dc.identifier.epage133-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats