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Article: How do birds' tails work? Delta-wing theory fails to predict tail shape during flight

TitleHow do birds' tails work? Delta-wing theory fails to predict tail shape during flight
Authors
KeywordsAerodynamic models
Birds' tails
Delta-wing theory
Issue Date2002
Citation
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2002, v. 269, n. 1495, p. 1053-1057 How to Cite?
AbstractBirds appear to use their tails during flight, but until recently the aerodynamic role that tails fulfil was largely unknown. In recent years delta-wing theory, devised to predict the aerodynamics of high-performance aircraft, has been applied to the tails of birds and has been successful in providing a model for the aerodynamics of a bird's tail. This theory now provides the conventional explanation for how birds' tails work. A delta-wing theory (slender-wing theory) has been used, as part of a variable-geometry model to predict how tail and wing shape should vary during flight at different airspeeds. We tested these predictions using barn swallows flying in a wind tunnel. We show that the predictions are not quantitatively well supported. This suggests that a new theory or a modified version of delta-wing theory is needed to adequately explain the way in which morphology varies during flight.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230720
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.823
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.375

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Matthew R.-
dc.contributor.authorRosén, Mikael-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Kirsty J.-
dc.contributor.authorHedenström, Anders-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:38Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:38Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2002, v. 269, n. 1495, p. 1053-1057-
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230720-
dc.description.abstractBirds appear to use their tails during flight, but until recently the aerodynamic role that tails fulfil was largely unknown. In recent years delta-wing theory, devised to predict the aerodynamics of high-performance aircraft, has been applied to the tails of birds and has been successful in providing a model for the aerodynamics of a bird's tail. This theory now provides the conventional explanation for how birds' tails work. A delta-wing theory (slender-wing theory) has been used, as part of a variable-geometry model to predict how tail and wing shape should vary during flight at different airspeeds. We tested these predictions using barn swallows flying in a wind tunnel. We show that the predictions are not quantitatively well supported. This suggests that a new theory or a modified version of delta-wing theory is needed to adequately explain the way in which morphology varies during flight.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences-
dc.subjectAerodynamic models-
dc.subjectBirds' tails-
dc.subjectDelta-wing theory-
dc.titleHow do birds' tails work? Delta-wing theory fails to predict tail shape during flight-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2001.1901-
dc.identifier.pmid12028763-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037157020-
dc.identifier.volume269-
dc.identifier.issue1495-
dc.identifier.spage1053-
dc.identifier.epage1057-
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2970-

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