File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Interactive Effects Between Maternal Parenting and Negative Emotionality on Social Functioning Among Very Young Chinese Children

TitleInteractive Effects Between Maternal Parenting and Negative Emotionality on Social Functioning Among Very Young Chinese Children
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Early Education and Development, 2016 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016 Taylor & FrancisResearch Findings: This study examined how child negative emotionality interacted with mothers’ self-reported parenting in predicting different aspects of social functioning among very young Chinese children. A total of 109 Chinese nursery children in Hong Kong participated with their parents. Maternal supportive and aversive parenting practices were reported by mothers, and child negative emotionality and social functioning were reported by both mothers and fathers. The results revealed interaction effects between child negative emotionality and mothers’ self-reported parenting on children’s internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and social-emotional skill deficiency. Specifically, children with high negative emotionality were more susceptible to the negative effects of aversive parenting (i.e., showing more internalizing and externalizing problems when exposed to aversive parenting) than their peers with low negative emotionality. Negative emotionality also placed young children at risk for social-emotional skill deficiency, especially when they received less support from their mothers compared to their peers. Practice or Policy: Special attention should be paid to the social functioning of Chinese children with higher levels of negative emotionality, because these children are more vulnerable to poor-quality parenting at a very young age.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230635
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.183
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.748

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRen, Lixin-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xiao-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Ning-
dc.contributor.authorNg, Mei Lee-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:25Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationEarly Education and Development, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn1040-9289-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230635-
dc.description.abstract© 2016 Taylor & FrancisResearch Findings: This study examined how child negative emotionality interacted with mothers’ self-reported parenting in predicting different aspects of social functioning among very young Chinese children. A total of 109 Chinese nursery children in Hong Kong participated with their parents. Maternal supportive and aversive parenting practices were reported by mothers, and child negative emotionality and social functioning were reported by both mothers and fathers. The results revealed interaction effects between child negative emotionality and mothers’ self-reported parenting on children’s internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and social-emotional skill deficiency. Specifically, children with high negative emotionality were more susceptible to the negative effects of aversive parenting (i.e., showing more internalizing and externalizing problems when exposed to aversive parenting) than their peers with low negative emotionality. Negative emotionality also placed young children at risk for social-emotional skill deficiency, especially when they received less support from their mothers compared to their peers. Practice or Policy: Special attention should be paid to the social functioning of Chinese children with higher levels of negative emotionality, because these children are more vulnerable to poor-quality parenting at a very young age.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Education and Development-
dc.titleInteractive Effects Between Maternal Parenting and Negative Emotionality on Social Functioning Among Very Young Chinese Children-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10409289.2016.1191001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84975159132-
dc.identifier.hkuros263328-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats