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Article: Immigrant employment and earnings growth in Canada and the USA: evidence from longitudinal data

TitleImmigrant employment and earnings growth in Canada and the USA: evidence from longitudinal data
Authors
KeywordsImmigration
Longitudinal data
Wages
US immigrants
Canadian immigrants
Comparative study
Economic assimilation
Employment
Issue Date2016
Citation
Journal of Population Economics, 2016, v. 29, n. 4, p. 1249-1277 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.We study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the USA using nationally representative longitudinal datasets covering 1996–2008. Models with person fixed effects show that, on average, immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the USA, on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to US-born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the USA than in Canada. We further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier arrivals, presumably reflecting selective return migration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230628
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.139
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.250

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKaushal, Neeraj-
dc.contributor.authorLu, Yao-
dc.contributor.authorDenier, Nicole-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Julia Shu Huah-
dc.contributor.authorTrejo, Stephen J.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:06:24Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:06:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Population Economics, 2016, v. 29, n. 4, p. 1249-1277-
dc.identifier.issn0933-1433-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230628-
dc.description.abstract© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.We study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the USA using nationally representative longitudinal datasets covering 1996–2008. Models with person fixed effects show that, on average, immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the USA, on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to US-born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the USA than in Canada. We further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier arrivals, presumably reflecting selective return migration.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Population Economics-
dc.subjectImmigration-
dc.subjectLongitudinal data-
dc.subjectWages-
dc.subjectUS immigrants-
dc.subjectCanadian immigrants-
dc.subjectComparative study-
dc.subjectEconomic assimilation-
dc.subjectEmployment-
dc.titleImmigrant employment and earnings growth in Canada and the USA: evidence from longitudinal data-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00148-016-0600-5-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84966709713-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1249-
dc.identifier.epage1277-

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