File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Supplementary

Book Chapter: Out of India: Language contact and change in Sarnami (Caribbean Hindustani)

TitleOut of India: Language contact and change in Sarnami (Caribbean Hindustani)
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherDe Gruyter Mouton
Citation
Out of India: Language contact and change in Sarnami (Caribbean Hindustani). In Yakpo, K & Muysken, PC (Eds.), Boundaries and bridges: Language contact in multilingual ecologies. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton, 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractSarnami, spoken in Suriname, is the only variety of Caribbean Hindustani that still has a sizeable speaker community. Sarnami is the result of the koineization of several northern Indian languages during Dutch colonial rule. A comparison of Sarnami with its closest Indian relatives suggests that contact with Sranan and Dutch has led to syntactic change, with an inherited head-final order giving way to head-initial order. SVO is far more frequent in Sarnami than in the Indian control group and. In relative constructions and with certain types of modal and aspectual auxiliary constructions, the transition has been made to NRel (postposed relative clauses) and AuxV (auxiliary-verb order). However, diachronically more stable constituent orders like noun vs. adjective, noun vs. adposition and noun vs. genitive have not been affected by change. Constituent order change in Sarnami is an example of the kind of convergence that characterises Suriname as a linguistic area, where the two dominant languages Sranan and Dutch simultaneously exert pressure toward typological change.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230446
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, K-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:17:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:17:05Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationOut of India: Language contact and change in Sarnami (Caribbean Hindustani). In Yakpo, K & Muysken, PC (Eds.), Boundaries and bridges: Language contact in multilingual ecologies. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton, 2017-
dc.identifier.isbn9781614514886-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230446-
dc.description.abstractSarnami, spoken in Suriname, is the only variety of Caribbean Hindustani that still has a sizeable speaker community. Sarnami is the result of the koineization of several northern Indian languages during Dutch colonial rule. A comparison of Sarnami with its closest Indian relatives suggests that contact with Sranan and Dutch has led to syntactic change, with an inherited head-final order giving way to head-initial order. SVO is far more frequent in Sarnami than in the Indian control group and. In relative constructions and with certain types of modal and aspectual auxiliary constructions, the transition has been made to NRel (postposed relative clauses) and AuxV (auxiliary-verb order). However, diachronically more stable constituent orders like noun vs. adjective, noun vs. adposition and noun vs. genitive have not been affected by change. Constituent order change in Sarnami is an example of the kind of convergence that characterises Suriname as a linguistic area, where the two dominant languages Sranan and Dutch simultaneously exert pressure toward typological change.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherDe Gruyter Mouton-
dc.relation.ispartofBoundaries and bridges: Language contact in multilingual ecologies-
dc.titleOut of India: Language contact and change in Sarnami (Caribbean Hindustani)-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715-
dc.identifier.hkuros260399-
dc.publisher.placeBerlin-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats