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Article: Dynamics and effects of Ligula intestinalis (L.) infection in the native fish Barbus callensis Valenciennes, 1842 in Algeria

TitleDynamics and effects of Ligula intestinalis (L.) infection in the native fish Barbus callensis Valenciennes, 1842 in Algeria
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherWalter de Gruyter GmbH. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ap
Citation
Acta Parasitologica, 2016, v. 61 n. 2, p. 307-318 How to Cite?
AbstractThe dynamics of the emergence, duration, and decline phases in epizootic cycles are well known for humans and some crops, but they are poorly understood for host–parasite systems in the wild. Parasites may be particularly insidious as they are often introduced unintentionally, simultaneously with their hosts, and later transferred to species in the new location. Here we investigate the epizootic dynamics of the tapeworm Ligula intestinalis in the Hamiz reservoir, Algeria, and explore its effects on the cyprinid fish Barbus callensis. Regular sampling was conducted from October 2005 to February 2008 with intermittent surveys carried out until 2010. Five percent of the 566 specimens of B. callensis that were caught were infected, with the maximum number of parasites found in spring. There was no obvious difference in weight between uninfected fish and infected ones, and infection did not affect fish condition. However, infected fish were significantly longer than uninfected fish and had inhibited gonad development. The proportion of infected fish caught was significantly higher in year 1 and by the second winter, infection collapsed to zero. The Ligula infection thus appeared to have minimal ecological effects and be of a temporary nature, thus exhibiting an epizootic cycle. Taken together, our data indicates that this infection declined or even failed during our study period. Failure may be due to the specific genetic strain of Ligula, but invasive carp may also have been influential in both the introduction and subsequent decline of this parasite.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230290
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.293
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.581

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOuldRouis, S-
dc.contributor.authorOuldRouis, A-
dc.contributor.authorDumont, HJ-
dc.contributor.authorMagellan, KMEG-
dc.contributor.authorArab, A-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:16:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:16:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationActa Parasitologica, 2016, v. 61 n. 2, p. 307-318-
dc.identifier.issn1230-2821-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230290-
dc.description.abstractThe dynamics of the emergence, duration, and decline phases in epizootic cycles are well known for humans and some crops, but they are poorly understood for host–parasite systems in the wild. Parasites may be particularly insidious as they are often introduced unintentionally, simultaneously with their hosts, and later transferred to species in the new location. Here we investigate the epizootic dynamics of the tapeworm Ligula intestinalis in the Hamiz reservoir, Algeria, and explore its effects on the cyprinid fish Barbus callensis. Regular sampling was conducted from October 2005 to February 2008 with intermittent surveys carried out until 2010. Five percent of the 566 specimens of B. callensis that were caught were infected, with the maximum number of parasites found in spring. There was no obvious difference in weight between uninfected fish and infected ones, and infection did not affect fish condition. However, infected fish were significantly longer than uninfected fish and had inhibited gonad development. The proportion of infected fish caught was significantly higher in year 1 and by the second winter, infection collapsed to zero. The Ligula infection thus appeared to have minimal ecological effects and be of a temporary nature, thus exhibiting an epizootic cycle. Taken together, our data indicates that this infection declined or even failed during our study period. Failure may be due to the specific genetic strain of Ligula, but invasive carp may also have been influential in both the introduction and subsequent decline of this parasite.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWalter de Gruyter GmbH. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ap-
dc.relation.ispartofActa Parasitologica-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at www.degruyter.com-
dc.titleDynamics and effects of Ligula intestinalis (L.) infection in the native fish Barbus callensis Valenciennes, 1842 in Algeria-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMagellan, KMEG: magellan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/ap-2016-0041-
dc.identifier.hkuros262050-
dc.identifier.volume61-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage307-
dc.identifier.epage318-
dc.publisher.placePoland-

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