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Conference Paper: Teacher motivation in Mumbai: a comparative study of two Non-Governmental Organisations in one school

TitleTeacher motivation in Mumbai: a comparative study of two Non-Governmental Organisations in one school
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
The 60th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES 2016), Vancouver, BC., Canada, 6-10 March 2016. How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the efforts of two non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in Mumbai, Maharashtra, in motivating school teachers, and maintaining job satisfaction. The study focused on educators at the Saibaba Path Mumbai Public School (SPMPS) - a primary and kindergarten school run by the NGO educo India. A low-income school situated in urban Mumbai, SPMPS provides free education to underprivileged children with English as the medium of instruction (MOI). This school also has Teach For India (TFI) intervention; TFI trains and places promising college graduates and young professionals in this and other low-income schools for a period of two years. Hence, two NGOs are operating in one school. Both educo and TFI lay emphasis on eradicating poverty by providing children with excellent quality education. However, despite similar interests, both organisations are vastly different in terms of the scale of their programs, overarching goals, pedagogy, intervention techniques, and, most importantly, teacher supervision and support systems. This study compared how both support their respective teachers. Moreover, how NGO-affiliated teachers differ from government school teachers in India in their motivation and job satisfaction levels was also explored. In this presentation, qualitative and quantitative data obtained from interviews and questionnaires are analysed alongside school observation field notes and related documentation and reports that concern the school and the two organisations. Overall, the results indicated that the teachers at SPMPS had high levels of job satisfaction and motivation, which can be attributed to: their inner satisfaction of being a teacher; accountability towards key stakeholders; respect and admiration received by parents and children (i.e. occupational status and interpersonal relations); perceived levels of competence; and initial training programs offered by educo and TFI. However for educo teachers, it is necessary to improve pay, career progression and job security, certain working conditions, training options, and management to ensure teachers remain motivated. On the other hand, TFI teachers need better interpersonal relations with the management of SPMPS - including a certain level of accountability towards them - continuous training that is more effective, and options for career progression. This study examines this school as one case study of teacher motivation in developing countries within the research context of the theories of Maslow (1943), Herzberg (1966), and Kemmerer (1990), and particularly Bennell and Akyeampong's (2007) previous study on Teacher Motivation in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. It has the potential to contribute to the discourse on teacher motivation by offering a different perspective, as a majority of the previously conducted studies (including Bennell & Akyeampong, 2007) have concentrated on government and private schools only. Given that a comparison is made between the two NGOs as well as between NGO-affiliated and government-affiliated teachers in India, this study is both international and comparative.
DescriptionParallel Session 1B - Comparing Organization and Systems
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230107

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJain, N-
dc.contributor.authorJackson, L-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:15:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:15:10Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 60th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES 2016), Vancouver, BC., Canada, 6-10 March 2016.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230107-
dc.descriptionParallel Session 1B - Comparing Organization and Systems-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the efforts of two non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in Mumbai, Maharashtra, in motivating school teachers, and maintaining job satisfaction. The study focused on educators at the Saibaba Path Mumbai Public School (SPMPS) - a primary and kindergarten school run by the NGO educo India. A low-income school situated in urban Mumbai, SPMPS provides free education to underprivileged children with English as the medium of instruction (MOI). This school also has Teach For India (TFI) intervention; TFI trains and places promising college graduates and young professionals in this and other low-income schools for a period of two years. Hence, two NGOs are operating in one school. Both educo and TFI lay emphasis on eradicating poverty by providing children with excellent quality education. However, despite similar interests, both organisations are vastly different in terms of the scale of their programs, overarching goals, pedagogy, intervention techniques, and, most importantly, teacher supervision and support systems. This study compared how both support their respective teachers. Moreover, how NGO-affiliated teachers differ from government school teachers in India in their motivation and job satisfaction levels was also explored. In this presentation, qualitative and quantitative data obtained from interviews and questionnaires are analysed alongside school observation field notes and related documentation and reports that concern the school and the two organisations. Overall, the results indicated that the teachers at SPMPS had high levels of job satisfaction and motivation, which can be attributed to: their inner satisfaction of being a teacher; accountability towards key stakeholders; respect and admiration received by parents and children (i.e. occupational status and interpersonal relations); perceived levels of competence; and initial training programs offered by educo and TFI. However for educo teachers, it is necessary to improve pay, career progression and job security, certain working conditions, training options, and management to ensure teachers remain motivated. On the other hand, TFI teachers need better interpersonal relations with the management of SPMPS - including a certain level of accountability towards them - continuous training that is more effective, and options for career progression. This study examines this school as one case study of teacher motivation in developing countries within the research context of the theories of Maslow (1943), Herzberg (1966), and Kemmerer (1990), and particularly Bennell and Akyeampong's (2007) previous study on Teacher Motivation in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. It has the potential to contribute to the discourse on teacher motivation by offering a different perspective, as a majority of the previously conducted studies (including Bennell & Akyeampong, 2007) have concentrated on government and private schools only. Given that a comparison is made between the two NGOs as well as between NGO-affiliated and government-affiliated teachers in India, this study is both international and comparative.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, CIES 2016-
dc.titleTeacher motivation in Mumbai: a comparative study of two Non-Governmental Organisations in one school-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailJackson, L: lizjackson@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJackson, L=rp01633-
dc.identifier.hkuros261839-

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