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Article: Anthropomorphized Helpers Undermine Autonomy and Enjoyment in Computer Games

TitleAnthropomorphized Helpers Undermine Autonomy and Enjoyment in Computer Games
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcr.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal of Consumer Research, 2016, v. 43 n. 2, p. 282-302 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough digital assistants with humanlike features have become prevalent in computer games, few marketing studies have demonstrated the psychological mechanisms underlying consumers’ reactions to digital assistants and their subsequent influence on consumers’ game enjoyment. To fill this gap, the current study examined the effect of anthropomorphic representations of computerized helpers in computer games on game enjoyment. In the current research, consumers enjoyed a computer game less when they received assistance from a computerized helper imbued with humanlike features than from a helper construed as a mindless entity. We offer a novel mechanism that the presence of an anthropomorphized helper can undermine individuals’ perceived autonomy during a computer game. Across six experiments, we show that the presence of an anthropomorphized helper reduced game enjoyment across three different games. By measuring participants’ perceived autonomy (study 1) and employing moderators such as importance of autonomy (studies 2, 3, and 4), we also provide evidence that the reduced feeling of autonomy serves as the mechanism underlying the backfiring effect. Finally, we demonstrate that the effect of anthropomorphism on game enjoyment can be extended to other game-related outcomes, such as individuals’ motivation to persist in the game (studies 4 and 5).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229660
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.896

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKim, S-
dc.contributor.authorChen, RP-
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, K-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:12:29Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:12:29Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Consumer Research, 2016, v. 43 n. 2, p. 282-302-
dc.identifier.issn0093-5301-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229660-
dc.description.abstractAlthough digital assistants with humanlike features have become prevalent in computer games, few marketing studies have demonstrated the psychological mechanisms underlying consumers’ reactions to digital assistants and their subsequent influence on consumers’ game enjoyment. To fill this gap, the current study examined the effect of anthropomorphic representations of computerized helpers in computer games on game enjoyment. In the current research, consumers enjoyed a computer game less when they received assistance from a computerized helper imbued with humanlike features than from a helper construed as a mindless entity. We offer a novel mechanism that the presence of an anthropomorphized helper can undermine individuals’ perceived autonomy during a computer game. Across six experiments, we show that the presence of an anthropomorphized helper reduced game enjoyment across three different games. By measuring participants’ perceived autonomy (study 1) and employing moderators such as importance of autonomy (studies 2, 3, and 4), we also provide evidence that the reduced feeling of autonomy serves as the mechanism underlying the backfiring effect. Finally, we demonstrate that the effect of anthropomorphism on game enjoyment can be extended to other game-related outcomes, such as individuals’ motivation to persist in the game (studies 4 and 5).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcr.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consumer Research-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here]. -
dc.titleAnthropomorphized Helpers Undermine Autonomy and Enjoyment in Computer Games-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKim, S: sarakim@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKim, S=rp01613-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jcr/ucw016-
dc.identifier.hkuros261130-
dc.identifier.volume43-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage282-
dc.identifier.epage302-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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