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Article: Not even the past: The joint influence of former leader and new leader during leader successions in the midst of organizational change

TitleNot even the past: The joint influence of former leader and new leader during leader successions in the midst of organizational change
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/apl.html
Citation
Journal of Applied Psychology, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractLeader succession often occurs during organizational change processes, but the implications of leader succession, in terms of reactions to the change, rarely have been investigated. Employee attitudes and behaviors during organizational change may be influenced jointly by a former leader who recently has transitioned out of the team and the new leader who recently has transitioned into it. We predict an interaction between former and new leaders’ transformational leadership on employees’ behavioral resistance to and support for change. Based on contrast effect theory, a highly transformational former leader constrains the potential effectiveness of the new leader, but a former leader low in transformational leadership enhances this potential effectiveness. We also propose conditional indirect effects transmitted through commitment to the changing organization. Our research was conducted in a large Chinese hospitality organization that was implementing radical organizational change, during which virtually all aspects of processes and products are changed. We collected a 2-wave multisource data from employees who had recently experienced a leader succession and their newly assigned leaders. Based on a final sample of 203 employees from 22 teams, we find empirical support for the proposed interaction effects. The conditional indirect effects were also consistent with our expectations, but the effect on behavioral resistance to change was stronger than the effect on behavioral support for change.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229655
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.81
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.641

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, HH-
dc.contributor.authorSeibert, SE-
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, MS-
dc.contributor.authorLee, C-
dc.contributor.authorLam, W-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:12:27Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:12:27Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Psychology, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn0021-9010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229655-
dc.description.abstractLeader succession often occurs during organizational change processes, but the implications of leader succession, in terms of reactions to the change, rarely have been investigated. Employee attitudes and behaviors during organizational change may be influenced jointly by a former leader who recently has transitioned out of the team and the new leader who recently has transitioned into it. We predict an interaction between former and new leaders’ transformational leadership on employees’ behavioral resistance to and support for change. Based on contrast effect theory, a highly transformational former leader constrains the potential effectiveness of the new leader, but a former leader low in transformational leadership enhances this potential effectiveness. We also propose conditional indirect effects transmitted through commitment to the changing organization. Our research was conducted in a large Chinese hospitality organization that was implementing radical organizational change, during which virtually all aspects of processes and products are changed. We collected a 2-wave multisource data from employees who had recently experienced a leader succession and their newly assigned leaders. Based on a final sample of 203 employees from 22 teams, we find empirical support for the proposed interaction effects. The conditional indirect effects were also consistent with our expectations, but the effect on behavioral resistance to change was stronger than the effect on behavioral support for change.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/apl.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Psychology-
dc.rightsJournal of Applied Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.rightsThis article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleNot even the past: The joint influence of former leader and new leader during leader successions in the midst of organizational change-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhao, HH: hhzhao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, HH=rp02124-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/apl0000149-
dc.identifier.pmid27537674-
dc.identifier.hkuros260093-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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