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Article: An international partnership analysis of a cohort of Vietnamese children with hearing impairment

TitleAn international partnership analysis of a cohort of Vietnamese children with hearing impairment
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/yslh20
Citation
Speech, Language and Hearing, 2016, v. 19 n. 1, p. 27-35 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: A better understanding of the hearing disability situation would advance hearing health care in the developing world. Vietnam is a lower middle income country with hearing health care in its early stages of development. This study examined the situation (degree, types, and causes) of hearing impairment, the effects of age and gender on hearing impairment, and the age of identification and its relationship with degree of hearing impairment, in a sample of Vietnamese children with hearing loss. Method: Sixty-nine participants aged from 20 to 129 months with prelingual-onset hearing loss were assessed during Global Foundation For Children With Hearing Loss international partnership activities. Data on hearing assessment findings, including case history and pure-tone audiometric outcomes, were analyzed. Results: Results showed that the hearing loss of participants ranged from moderate to profound levels (mean pure-tone average in better ear = 95.9 dB HL, range = 51.7–125.0 dB, SD = 17.37). Sensorineural pathologies accounted for 80% of identified hearing loss. Maternal rubella was the most commonly identified cause of hearing loss, with this disease reported as confirmed in 32% of children and suspected in another 13% of the participants. Genetic factors were suspected in at least 13% of children. Age and gender showed no statistically significant associations with degree of hearing impairment. The average age of identification was 23.2 months (range = 2–68 months, SD = 12.82) and a greater proportion (65%) of children with profound hearing loss than those with milder degrees of hearing loss were noted. Conclusion: To reduce the prevalence of childhood hearing loss and its adverse long-term effects, improved immunization programs against infectious diseases, further development of universal newborn hearing screening and early intervention programs, and greater access to hearing technology in Vietnam are highly recommended.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229525
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, AMK-
dc.contributor.authorStringer, P-
dc.contributor.authorToizumi, M-
dc.contributor.authorDang, DA-
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, DB-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:11:41Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:11:41Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationSpeech, Language and Hearing, 2016, v. 19 n. 1, p. 27-35-
dc.identifier.issn2050-571X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229525-
dc.description.abstractAim: A better understanding of the hearing disability situation would advance hearing health care in the developing world. Vietnam is a lower middle income country with hearing health care in its early stages of development. This study examined the situation (degree, types, and causes) of hearing impairment, the effects of age and gender on hearing impairment, and the age of identification and its relationship with degree of hearing impairment, in a sample of Vietnamese children with hearing loss. Method: Sixty-nine participants aged from 20 to 129 months with prelingual-onset hearing loss were assessed during Global Foundation For Children With Hearing Loss international partnership activities. Data on hearing assessment findings, including case history and pure-tone audiometric outcomes, were analyzed. Results: Results showed that the hearing loss of participants ranged from moderate to profound levels (mean pure-tone average in better ear = 95.9 dB HL, range = 51.7–125.0 dB, SD = 17.37). Sensorineural pathologies accounted for 80% of identified hearing loss. Maternal rubella was the most commonly identified cause of hearing loss, with this disease reported as confirmed in 32% of children and suspected in another 13% of the participants. Genetic factors were suspected in at least 13% of children. Age and gender showed no statistically significant associations with degree of hearing impairment. The average age of identification was 23.2 months (range = 2–68 months, SD = 12.82) and a greater proportion (65%) of children with profound hearing loss than those with milder degrees of hearing loss were noted. Conclusion: To reduce the prevalence of childhood hearing loss and its adverse long-term effects, improved immunization programs against infectious diseases, further development of universal newborn hearing screening and early intervention programs, and greater access to hearing technology in Vietnam are highly recommended.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/yslh20-
dc.relation.ispartofSpeech, Language and Hearing-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI] -
dc.titleAn international partnership analysis of a cohort of Vietnamese children with hearing impairment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMcPherson, DB: dbmcpher@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMcPherson, DB=rp00937-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/2050571X.2015.1108066-
dc.identifier.hkuros259897-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage27-
dc.identifier.epage35-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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