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Article: Acculturation and Bicultural Efficacy Effects on Chinese American Immigrants' Diabetes and Health Management

TitleAcculturation and Bicultural Efficacy Effects on Chinese American Immigrants' Diabetes and Health Management
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0160-7715
Citation
Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 2016, v. 39 n. 5, p. 896-907 How to Cite?
AbstractThe primary goal of this study was to examine effects of bicultural efficacy, or perceived confidence in dealing with bicultural acculturation stressors, on type 2 diabetes management and health for first-generation, Cantonese-speaking, Chinese American immigrants (N = 162) recruited for a larger community-based diabetes intervention study (Chesla et al. in Res Nurs Health 36(4):359–372, 2013. doi:10.1002/nur.21543). The current study also tested whether a new Bicultural Efficacy in Health Management (BEFF-HM) scale is a more robust predictor of diabetes and health outcomes than proxy (years in the U.S.) and general acculturation measures. Hierarchical regression analyses of cross-sectional data revealed that high BEFF-HM was significantly related to positive outcomes on five of six diabetes and health measures as hypothesized after accounting for participant characteristics, proxy and general acculturation measures, and social support. Proxy and general acculturation measures failed to predict any study outcome supporting our secondary hypothesis that BEFF-HM is a better predictor of Chinese American immigrants’ diabetes and health management. An immigrant-focused research approach advances understanding of acculturation and bicultural efficacy effects on health by identifying key acculturation domains for study.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229427
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.227
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.069

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChun, KM-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, CM-
dc.contributor.authorStrycker, LA-
dc.contributor.authorChesla, CA-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:11:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:11:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Behavioral Medicine, 2016, v. 39 n. 5, p. 896-907-
dc.identifier.issn0160-7715-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229427-
dc.description.abstractThe primary goal of this study was to examine effects of bicultural efficacy, or perceived confidence in dealing with bicultural acculturation stressors, on type 2 diabetes management and health for first-generation, Cantonese-speaking, Chinese American immigrants (N = 162) recruited for a larger community-based diabetes intervention study (Chesla et al. in Res Nurs Health 36(4):359–372, 2013. doi:10.1002/nur.21543). The current study also tested whether a new Bicultural Efficacy in Health Management (BEFF-HM) scale is a more robust predictor of diabetes and health outcomes than proxy (years in the U.S.) and general acculturation measures. Hierarchical regression analyses of cross-sectional data revealed that high BEFF-HM was significantly related to positive outcomes on five of six diabetes and health measures as hypothesized after accounting for participant characteristics, proxy and general acculturation measures, and social support. Proxy and general acculturation measures failed to predict any study outcome supporting our secondary hypothesis that BEFF-HM is a better predictor of Chinese American immigrants’ diabetes and health management. An immigrant-focused research approach advances understanding of acculturation and bicultural efficacy effects on health by identifying key acculturation domains for study.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0160-7715-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Behavioral Medicine-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-016-9766-2-
dc.titleAcculturation and Bicultural Efficacy Effects on Chinese American Immigrants' Diabetes and Health Management-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKwan, CM: cmlkwan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKwan, CM=rp02102-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10865-016-9766-2-
dc.identifier.pmid27412776-
dc.identifier.hkuros259183-
dc.identifier.volume39-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage896-
dc.identifier.epage907-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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