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Article: Feasibility of resuming peritoneal dialysis after severe peritonitis and Tenckhoff catheter removal

TitleFeasibility of resuming peritoneal dialysis after severe peritonitis and Tenckhoff catheter removal
Authors
Issue Date2002
Citation
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2002, v. 13, n. 4, p. 1040-1045 How to Cite?
AbstractPublished guidelines suggest that after an episode of severe peritonitis that requires Tenckhoff catheter removal, peritoneal dialysis can be resumed after a minimum of 3 wk. However, the feasibility of resuming peritoneal dialysis after Tenckhoff catheter removal remains unknown. One hundred patients were identified with peritonitis that did not respond to standard antibiotic therapy in a specific center. Their clinical course was reviewed; in all of them, Tenckhoff catheters were removed and reinsertion was attempted at least 4 wk later. In 51 patients, the Tenckhoff catheter was successfully reinserted and peritoneal dialysis was resumed (success group). In the other 49 patients, reinsertion failed and the patient was put on long-term hemodialysis (fail group). The patients were followed for 18.5 ± 16.8 mo. The overall technique survival was 30.8% at 24 mo. In the success group, 11 patients were changed to long-term hemodialysis within 8 mo after their return to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. In the fail group, 18 of the 20 deaths occurred within 12 mo after conversion to long-term hemodialysis. After resuming peritoneal dialysis, there was a significant decline in net ultrafiltration volume (0.38 ± 0.16 to 0.21 ± 0.19 L; P = 0.03) and a trend of rise in dialysate-to-plasma ratios of creatinine at 4 h (0.664 ± 0.095 to 0.725 ± 0.095; P = 0.15). Forty-five patients (88.2%) required additional dialysis exchanges or hypertonic dialysate to compensate for the loss of solute clearance or ultrafiltration, although there was no significant change in dialysis adequacy or nutritional status. It was concluded that after an episode of severe peritonitis that required Tenckhoff catheter removal, only a small group of patients could return to peritoneal dialysis. An early assessment of peritoneal function after Tenckhoff catheter reinsertion may be valuable.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228451
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.699

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, Cheuk Chun-
dc.contributor.authorChow, Kai Ming-
dc.contributor.authorWong, T. Y H-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Chi B.-
dc.contributor.authorWang, A. Y M-
dc.contributor.authorLui, Siu Fai-
dc.contributor.authorLi, P. K T-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-13T08:02:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-13T08:02:26Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2002, v. 13, n. 4, p. 1040-1045-
dc.identifier.issn1046-6673-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228451-
dc.description.abstractPublished guidelines suggest that after an episode of severe peritonitis that requires Tenckhoff catheter removal, peritoneal dialysis can be resumed after a minimum of 3 wk. However, the feasibility of resuming peritoneal dialysis after Tenckhoff catheter removal remains unknown. One hundred patients were identified with peritonitis that did not respond to standard antibiotic therapy in a specific center. Their clinical course was reviewed; in all of them, Tenckhoff catheters were removed and reinsertion was attempted at least 4 wk later. In 51 patients, the Tenckhoff catheter was successfully reinserted and peritoneal dialysis was resumed (success group). In the other 49 patients, reinsertion failed and the patient was put on long-term hemodialysis (fail group). The patients were followed for 18.5 ± 16.8 mo. The overall technique survival was 30.8% at 24 mo. In the success group, 11 patients were changed to long-term hemodialysis within 8 mo after their return to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. In the fail group, 18 of the 20 deaths occurred within 12 mo after conversion to long-term hemodialysis. After resuming peritoneal dialysis, there was a significant decline in net ultrafiltration volume (0.38 ± 0.16 to 0.21 ± 0.19 L; P = 0.03) and a trend of rise in dialysate-to-plasma ratios of creatinine at 4 h (0.664 ± 0.095 to 0.725 ± 0.095; P = 0.15). Forty-five patients (88.2%) required additional dialysis exchanges or hypertonic dialysate to compensate for the loss of solute clearance or ultrafiltration, although there was no significant change in dialysis adequacy or nutritional status. It was concluded that after an episode of severe peritonitis that required Tenckhoff catheter removal, only a small group of patients could return to peritoneal dialysis. An early assessment of peritoneal function after Tenckhoff catheter reinsertion may be valuable.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Society of Nephrology-
dc.titleFeasibility of resuming peritoneal dialysis after severe peritonitis and Tenckhoff catheter removal-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11912264-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036205786-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1040-
dc.identifier.epage1045-

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