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Article: Posttransplant Epstein-Barr virus-associated myogenic tumors involving bone: A case report

TitlePosttransplant Epstein-Barr virus-associated myogenic tumors involving bone: A case report
Authors
KeywordsEBER (Epstein-Barr virus-encoded messenger RNA), EBNA-2 (Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-2)
Issue Date2000
Citation
Cancer, 2000, v. 89, n. 2, p. 467-472 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated myogenic tumors in immunocompromised patients were recently recognized, but their biologic behavior remains only partially understood. Although observations so far have permitted the recognition of similarities between posttransplant myogenic tumors and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), the number of reports are still few, and new experiences continue to be informative. METHODS. The authors describe what they believe is the first example of posttransplant EBV-associated myogenic tumor involving bone, which is also remarkable for its multicentric symmetric limb distribution. Immunohistochemistry of tumor cells for myogenic antigens (desmin and smooth muscle actin), EBV antigens (latency proteins latent membrane protein-1 [LMP- 1], Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-2 [EBNA-2], and ZEBRA), p53, and bcl-2 was examined by standard avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex methods. Molecular techniques investigated in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded messenger RNAs (EBERs) and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for p53 mutation. RESULTS. Although the biologic behavior of this tumor was uncertain, the reduction of immunosuppression arrested tumor growth for 5 years, at the expense of some loss in renal function. The occurrence of episodes of acute cellular rejection required pulse therapy, resulting in the appearance of new lesions in both liver and lungs. Despite these complications, a balance between control of this multicentric tumor growth and allograft survival has been maintained for 8 years. CONCLUSIONS. To the authors' knowledge, this example of posttransplant myogenic tumor is the first described in the bone. It shows partial response to immunomodulation with persistent tumor, with prolonged survival of the renal allograft. (C) 2000 American Cancer Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228436
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.649
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.188

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, Ka Fai-
dc.contributor.authorLai, Fernand M M-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Angela Y M-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Chi Bon-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Paul C L-
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, Cheuk Chun-
dc.contributor.authorLui, Sui Fai-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Alex W Y-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Philip Kam Tao-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-13T08:02:24Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-13T08:02:24Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.citationCancer, 2000, v. 89, n. 2, p. 467-472-
dc.identifier.issn0008-543X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228436-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated myogenic tumors in immunocompromised patients were recently recognized, but their biologic behavior remains only partially understood. Although observations so far have permitted the recognition of similarities between posttransplant myogenic tumors and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), the number of reports are still few, and new experiences continue to be informative. METHODS. The authors describe what they believe is the first example of posttransplant EBV-associated myogenic tumor involving bone, which is also remarkable for its multicentric symmetric limb distribution. Immunohistochemistry of tumor cells for myogenic antigens (desmin and smooth muscle actin), EBV antigens (latency proteins latent membrane protein-1 [LMP- 1], Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-2 [EBNA-2], and ZEBRA), p53, and bcl-2 was examined by standard avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex methods. Molecular techniques investigated in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded messenger RNAs (EBERs) and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for p53 mutation. RESULTS. Although the biologic behavior of this tumor was uncertain, the reduction of immunosuppression arrested tumor growth for 5 years, at the expense of some loss in renal function. The occurrence of episodes of acute cellular rejection required pulse therapy, resulting in the appearance of new lesions in both liver and lungs. Despite these complications, a balance between control of this multicentric tumor growth and allograft survival has been maintained for 8 years. CONCLUSIONS. To the authors' knowledge, this example of posttransplant myogenic tumor is the first described in the bone. It shows partial response to immunomodulation with persistent tumor, with prolonged survival of the renal allograft. (C) 2000 American Cancer Society.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCancer-
dc.subjectEBER (Epstein-Barr virus-encoded messenger RNA), EBNA-2 (Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-2)-
dc.titlePosttransplant Epstein-Barr virus-associated myogenic tumors involving bone: A case report-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/1097-0142(20000715)89:2<467::AID-CNCR36>3.0.CO;2-C-
dc.identifier.pmid10918181-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034661705-
dc.identifier.volume89-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage467-
dc.identifier.epage472-

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