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Article: Enhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation via systematic novelty exposure: The influence of maternal HPA function

TitleEnhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation via systematic novelty exposure: The influence of maternal HPA function
Authors
KeywordsEarly experience
Issue Date2014
Citation
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2014, v. 8, n. JUNE How to Cite?
AbstractIn the rat, repeated brief exposures to novelty early in life can induce long-lasting enhancements in adult cognitive, social, emotional, and neuroendocrine function. Family-to-family variations in these intervention effects on adult offspring are predicted by the mother's ability to mount a rapid corticosterone (CORT) response to the onset of an acute stressor. Here, in Long-Evans rats, we investigated whether neonatal and adulthood novelty exposure, each individually and in combination, can enhance offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation. Using a 2 × 2 within-litter design, one half of each litter were exposed to a relatively novel non-home environment for 3-min (Neo_Novel) daily during infancy (PND 1-21) and the other half of the litter remained in the home cage (Neo_Home); we further exposed half of these two groups to early adulthood (PND 54-63) novelty exposure in an open field and the remaining siblings stayed in their home cages. Two aspects of HPA regulation were assessed: the ability to maintain a low level of resting CORT (CORTB) and the ability to mount a large rapid CORT response (CORTE) to the onset of an acute stressor. Assessment of adult offspring's ability to regulate HPA regulation began at 370 days of age. We further investigated whether the novelty exposure effects on offspring HPA regulation are sensitive to the context of maternal HPA regulation by assessing maternal HPA regulation similarly beginning 7 days after her pups were weaned. We found that at the population level, rats receiving neonatal, but not early adulthood exposure or both, showed a greater rapid CORTE than their home-staying siblings. At the individual family level, these novelty effects are positively associated with maternal CORTE. These results suggest that early experience of novelty can enhance the offspring's ability to mount a rapid response to environmental challenge and the success of such early life intervention is critically dependent upon the context of maternal HPA regulation. © 2014 Dinces, Romeo, McEwen and Tang.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228191
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.392
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.803

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDinces, Sarah M.-
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, Russell D.-
dc.contributor.authorMcEwen, Bruce S.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:25Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:25Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2014, v. 8, n. JUNE-
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228191-
dc.description.abstractIn the rat, repeated brief exposures to novelty early in life can induce long-lasting enhancements in adult cognitive, social, emotional, and neuroendocrine function. Family-to-family variations in these intervention effects on adult offspring are predicted by the mother's ability to mount a rapid corticosterone (CORT) response to the onset of an acute stressor. Here, in Long-Evans rats, we investigated whether neonatal and adulthood novelty exposure, each individually and in combination, can enhance offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation. Using a 2 × 2 within-litter design, one half of each litter were exposed to a relatively novel non-home environment for 3-min (Neo_Novel) daily during infancy (PND 1-21) and the other half of the litter remained in the home cage (Neo_Home); we further exposed half of these two groups to early adulthood (PND 54-63) novelty exposure in an open field and the remaining siblings stayed in their home cages. Two aspects of HPA regulation were assessed: the ability to maintain a low level of resting CORT (CORTB) and the ability to mount a large rapid CORT response (CORTE) to the onset of an acute stressor. Assessment of adult offspring's ability to regulate HPA regulation began at 370 days of age. We further investigated whether the novelty exposure effects on offspring HPA regulation are sensitive to the context of maternal HPA regulation by assessing maternal HPA regulation similarly beginning 7 days after her pups were weaned. We found that at the population level, rats receiving neonatal, but not early adulthood exposure or both, showed a greater rapid CORTE than their home-staying siblings. At the individual family level, these novelty effects are positively associated with maternal CORTE. These results suggest that early experience of novelty can enhance the offspring's ability to mount a rapid response to environmental challenge and the success of such early life intervention is critically dependent upon the context of maternal HPA regulation. © 2014 Dinces, Romeo, McEwen and Tang.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience-
dc.subjectEarly experience-
dc.titleEnhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation via systematic novelty exposure: The influence of maternal HPA function-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00204-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84901978624-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issueJUNE-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-

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