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Article: On the causes of early life experience effects: Evaluating the role of mom

TitleOn the causes of early life experience effects: Evaluating the role of mom
Authors
KeywordsCognitive development
Issue Date2014
Citation
Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, 2014, v. 35, n. 2, p. 245-251 How to Cite?
AbstractEarly life experiences are thought to have long-lasting effects on cognitive, emotional, and social function during adulthood. Changes in neuroendocrine function, particularly the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, contribute to these systems-level behavioral effects. In searching for causal mechanisms underlying these early experience effects, pioneering research has demonstrated an important role for maternal care in offspring development, and this has led to two persistent ideas that permeate current research and thinking: first, environmental impact on the developing infant is mediated through maternal care behavior; second, the more care that a mother provides, the better off her offspring. While a good beginning, the reality is likely more complex. In this review, we critically examine these ideas and propose a computationally-motivated theoretical framework, and within this framework, we consider evidence supporting a hypothesis of maternal modulation. These findings may inform policy decisions in the context of child health and development. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228179
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.852
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.068

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.contributor.authorReeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.-
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, Russell D.-
dc.contributor.authorMcEwen, Bruce S.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:23Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Neuroendocrinology, 2014, v. 35, n. 2, p. 245-251-
dc.identifier.issn0091-3022-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228179-
dc.description.abstractEarly life experiences are thought to have long-lasting effects on cognitive, emotional, and social function during adulthood. Changes in neuroendocrine function, particularly the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, contribute to these systems-level behavioral effects. In searching for causal mechanisms underlying these early experience effects, pioneering research has demonstrated an important role for maternal care in offspring development, and this has led to two persistent ideas that permeate current research and thinking: first, environmental impact on the developing infant is mediated through maternal care behavior; second, the more care that a mother provides, the better off her offspring. While a good beginning, the reality is likely more complex. In this review, we critically examine these ideas and propose a computationally-motivated theoretical framework, and within this framework, we consider evidence supporting a hypothesis of maternal modulation. These findings may inform policy decisions in the context of child health and development. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Neuroendocrinology-
dc.subjectCognitive development-
dc.titleOn the causes of early life experience effects: Evaluating the role of mom-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yfrne.2013.11.002-
dc.identifier.pmid24246856-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84896140096-
dc.identifier.volume35-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage245-
dc.identifier.epage251-
dc.identifier.eissn1095-6808-

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